BCS


BCS

in full  Bowl Championship Series 
  College football national champions College football national championsarrangement of five American college postseason gridiron football (football, gridiron) games that annually determines the national champion. The games involved are the Rose Bowl, the Orange Bowl, the Sugar Bowl, the Fiesta Bowl, and the BCS National Championship Game.

      The teams that participate in the BCS are drawn from the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS; formerly known as Division I-A) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and are determined by a ranking system that consists of three equally weighted components: the USA Today Coaches' Poll, the Harris Interactive College Football Poll, and an average of six computer rankings. (The computer rankings are created by specially designed programs that take into account a number of variables, which may include—but are not limited to—win-loss record, strength of a team's schedule, game locations, and margin of victory.) The two teams that top the rankings at the end of the regular season meet in the BCS National Championship Game, which rotates its location between the sites of the four bowls and takes place a few days after the bowl game that is traditionally held at that site. The 10 BCS participants are selected by the individual bowl committees from a pool that consists of the automatically qualifying champions of the six “major conferences” (the Atlantic Coast (Atlantic Coast Conference), Big East, Big 12 (Big 12 Conference), Big Ten (Big Ten Conference), Pacific-10 (Pacific-10 Conference), and Southeastern (Southeastern Conference) conferences) and four at-large teams. There is also a stipulation that awards automatic BCS berths—at the expense of major conference at-large selections—to members of the five other conferences in the FBS if they are among the top 12 teams in the final BCS rankings. Moreover, by special arrangement, if the University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, University of), a traditional football power that has no conference affiliation, is among the top eight teams in the final BCS rankings, it too receives an automatic berth.

      The BCS is the first true postseason football championship arrangement in the history of the NCAA's highest division. Since the 1970s the NCAA's lower divisions—the Football Championship Subdivision (formerly Division I-AA), Division II, and Division III—and the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) have determined their national champions through single-elimination tournaments with fields ranging from 16 to 32 teams. Previously, the title of Division I-A “national champion” was bestowed on the team (or teams) that ended the season atop one of the polls taken of a fixed pool of coaches or sportswriters. Conventionally, the teams ranked first in the Associated Press (AP), United Press International (UPI), and coaches' polls were given the greatest claim to the title, but various other polls also named national champions throughout the years. As a result, many seasons ended with split national champions. Because of contractual obligations between bowl games and conferences, postseason matchups between the two consensus top-ranked teams occurred in only 8 of the 57 seasons between 1936 (the first year of the AP poll) and 1992.

      Precursors to the BCS were established in 1992 and 1995. The 1992 arrangement, known as the Bowl Coalition, instituted a selection process for four bowl games—the Cotton, Fiesta, Orange, and Sugar bowls—from among Atlantic Coast, Big East, Big 8 (precursor of the Big 12), Southeastern, and Southwest (Southwest Conference) conferences, as well as Notre Dame, that eliminated some conference-bowl affiliations in an attempt to facilitate more prestigious postseason matchups. The effectiveness of the Bowl Coalition was limited, however—first and foremost by exclusion of the Big Ten and Pacific-10 champions, which remained obligated to the Rose Bowl, but also by conference-bowl obligations that provided finite opportunities for matchups between the two top-ranked teams. This structure produced two de facto national championship games in the Bowl Coalition's three years of existence, but another arrangement—the Bowl Alliance, instituted in 1995—eliminated all bowl affiliations for the five participating conferences and for Notre Dame and removed the Cotton Bowl from the scheme (because of the planned dissolution in 1996 of the Southwest Conference, to which the bowl had long been tied). The new agreement produced a matchup between the two top-ranked teams in its first year, but the continued absence of the Big Ten and Pacific-10 conferences from the Bowl Alliance prevented true number one versus number two pairings in the next two seasons. These two conferences (along with the Rose Bowl) joined with the Bowl Alliance institutions and bowls in 1998 to form the BCS. Through the first eight years of the BCS, each bowl game hosted the national championship game every fourth year, but in 2006 an additional stand-alone championship game was created.

      While the BCS and its forerunners produced matchups of the two top-ranked teams in the coaches' poll in 10 of the first 16 years of the system, the arrangements were not without controversy. In 2003 the University of Southern California (Southern California, University of) was not selected to play in the national championship game despite ending the regular season atop both the AP and coaches' polls, because of its relatively low computer rankings. This resulted in the only split championship in the BCS era and led to the replacement of the AP poll by the Harris poll in the BCS formula. Many observers have agitated for the FBS to adopt a playoff format similar to that of the lower college football divisions, but the bowl tradition (more than 30 games played from just before Christmas to just after New Year's Day, usually in warm locales, attracting hundreds of thousands of vacationing fans) and financial windfall provided by bowls make such a change unlikely.

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Universalium. 2010.

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