neorealism


neorealism
neorealist, n., adj.
/nee'oh ree"euh liz'euhm/, n.
1. (sometimes cap.) any of various movements in literature, art, etc., that are considered as a return to a more realistic style.
2. a philosophy developed chiefly by 20th-century American philosophers, including Montague and Santayana, characterized by a presentationist epistemology and by the assertion of the real status of universals.
3. Motion Pictures. a style of filming prominent in Italy after World War II, characterized by a concern for social issues and often shot on location with untrained actors. Also called New Realism (for defs. 1, 2).
[1915-20; NEO- + REALISM]

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or neorealismo

Italian aesthetic movement that flourished especially after World War II. It sought to deal realistically with the events leading up to the war and with their resulting social problems.

Rooted in the 1920s, it was similar to the verismo ("realism") movement, from which it originated, but differed in that its upsurge resulted from the intense feelings inspired by fascist repression, the Resistance, and the war. Neorealist writers include Italo Calvino, Alberto Moravia, and Cesare Pavese. During the fascist years many Neorealist writers went into hiding, were imprisoned or exiled, or joined the Resistance. The movement reemerged in full strength after the war. Neorealism in film embraced a documentary-like objectivity; actors were often amatuers, and the action centred on commonplace situations. Often crudely and hastily made, Neorealist productions stood in stark contrast to traditional escapist feature films.Two notable examples of Neorealist films are Roberto Rossellini's Open City (1945) and Vittorio De Sica's The Bicycle Thief (1948).

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▪ Italian art
Introduction
Italian  Neorealismo,  

      Italian literary and cinematic movement, flourishing especially after World War II, seeking to deal realistically with the events leading up to the war and with the social problems that were engendered during the period and afterwards.

Literature.
      The movement was rooted in the 1920s and, though suppressed for nearly two decades by Fascist control, emerged in great strength after the Fascist regime fell at the end of World War II. Neorealismo is similar in general aims to the earlier Italian movement verismo (Realism), from which it originated, but differs in that its upsurge was brought about by the intense feelings, experiences, and convictions that Fascist repression, the Resistance, and the war had instilled in its many gifted writers. Added impetus was given the movement by the translation of many socially conscious U.S. and English writers during the 1930s and 1940s.

      Among the outstanding Neorealist writers are Nobel Prize-winning poet Salvatore Quasimodo and the fiction writers Alberto Moravia (Moravia, Alberto), Ignazio Silone, Carlo Levi, Vasco Pratolini, Carlo Bernari, Cesare Pavese, Elio Vittorini, Carlo Cassola, Italo Calvino, Curzio Malaparte (in postwar writings), and Carlo Emilio Gadda.

      The emergence of Neorealism during the Fascist years was sporadic. Moravia wrote perhaps the first representative work in Gli indifferenti (1929; first Eng. trans., 1932, best trans., The Time of Indifference, 1953). Ignazio Silone (Silone, Ignazio) was internationally known for anti-Fascist works written from Swiss exile, beginning with Fontamara (1930; Eng. trans., 1934); and Elio Vittorini (Vittorini, Elio) wrote veiled criticism of the Fascist regime in a brilliant, Hemingway-like novel, Conversazione in Sicilia (1941; Conversation in Sicily, 1948). Many Neorealist writers were driven into hiding (Moravia), put in prison (Pavese, Vittorini), or sent into exile (Silone, Levi); many others joined the Resistance (Vittorini, Calvino, Cassola); some took refuge in introspective movements such as Hermeticism (Quasimodo) or in translating the works of others (Pavese, Vittorini).

      After the war the movement exploded in full strength. Vasco Pratolini (Pratolini, Vasco) left his autobiographical work behind and published such vivid and moving accounts of the Florentine poor as Il quartiere (1944; The Naked Streets, 1952) and one of the finest novels of the Neorealist movement, Cronache di poveri amanti (1947; A Tale of Poor Lovers, 1949). Curzio Malaparte (Malaparte, Curzio), who had repudiated his earlier Fascist loyalties, produced two powerful novels about the war, Kaputt (1944; Eng. trans., 1946) and La pelle (1949; The Skin, 1952). Elio Vittorini wrote openly about his Resistance experiences in Uomini e no (1945; “Men and Non-men”). And Carlo Levi (Levi, Carlo) earned international fame with his compassionate study of the plight of peasants in southern Italy (where he had been exiled), Cristo si è fermato a Eboli (1945; Christ Stopped at Eboli).

      Other writers also felt the compulsion to communicate life as it then was or as it had been. Salvatore Quasimodo (Quasimodo, Salvatore) emerged from Hermeticism and began to publish poetry about the war and social problems, beginning with Giorno dopo giorno (1947; “Day After Day”). Moravia resumed his writing and published many outstanding Neorealistic novels. Cesare Pavese (Pavese, Cesare) contributed two accounts of his life in a fascist prison and many introspective novels about contemporary despair. Italo Calvino (Calvino, Italo) and Carlo Cassola (Cassola, Carlo) left stirring accounts of the Resistance experience, Calvino in Il sentiero dei nidi di ragno (1947; The Path to the Nest of Spiders) and Cassola in Il taglio del bosco (1959; “Timber Cutting”) and La ragazza di Bube (1960; Bubo's Girl).

Motion pictures.
      The Neorealistic movement in film paralleled the Italian literary movement. The films' style was a documentary-like objectivity; actors either were or looked like ordinary people involved in commonplace situations. Although Neorealist productions were often crudely and hastily made, their radical departure from the escapist idealization of traditional moviemaking and their boldness in handling contemporary themes had an international impact.

      The first of such pictures to appear was Roberto Rossellini's (Rossellini, Roberto) Open City (1945), an antifascist film showing the brutal decisions imposed on the Italians by the Nazi occupation. Rossellini's Paisan (1946), six vignettes of the war in Italy, had a similar harrowing quality. Other important Neorealist films were Vittorio De Sica's (De Sica, Vittorio) Shoeshine (1946) and The Bicycle Thief (1948), dealing with the everyday life of working-class Italians, and Luchino Visconti's (Visconti, Luchino) La terra trema (1948; The Earth Trembles), a story of impoverished Sicilian fishermen, which used no professional actors. After 1950 the trend of Italian films turned from realism toward fantasy, symbolism, and literary themes.

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Universalium. 2010.

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