compound


compound
compound1
compoundable, adj.compoundedness, n.compounder, n.
adj. /kom"pownd, kom pownd"/; n. /kom"pownd/; v. /keuhm pownd", kom"pownd/, adj.
1. composed of two or more parts, elements, or ingredients: Soap is a compound substance.
2. having or involving two or more actions or functions: The mouth is a compound organ.
3. Gram. of or pertaining to a compound sentence or compound-complex sentence.
4. (of a word)
a. consisting of two or more parts that are also bases, as housetop, many-sided, playact, or upon.
b. consisting of any two or more parts that have identifiable meaning, as a base and a noninflectional affix (return, follower), a base and a combining form (biochemistry), two combining forms (ethnography), or a combining form and a noninflectional affix (aviary, dentoid).
5. (of a verb tense) consisting of an auxiliary verb and a main verb, as are swimming, have spoken, or will write (opposed to simple).
6. Bot. composed of several similar parts that combine to form a whole: a compound fruit.
7. Zool. composed of a number of distinct individuals that are connected to form a united whole or colony, as coral.
8. Music. of or pertaining to compound time.
9. Mach. noting an engine or turbine expanding the same steam or the like in two successive chambers to do work at two ranges of pressure.
n.
10. something formed by compounding or combining parts, elements, etc.
11. Chem. a pure substance composed of two or more elements whose composition is constant.
12. a compound word, esp. one composed of two or more words that are otherwise unaltered, as moonflower or rainstorm.
v.t.
13. to put together into a whole; combine: to compound drugs to form a new medicine.
14. to make or form by combining parts, elements, etc.; construct: to compound a new plan from parts of several former plans.
15. to make up or constitute: all the organs and members that compound a human body.
16. to settle or adjust by agreement, esp. for a reduced amount, as a debt.
17. Law. to agree, for a consideration, not to prosecute or punish a wrongdoer for: to compound a crime or felony.
18. to pay (interest) on the accrued interest as well as the principal: My bank compounds interest quarterly.
19. to increase or add to: The misery of his loneliness was now compounded by his poverty.
20. Elect. to connect a portion of the field turns of (a direct-current dynamo) in series with the armature circuit.
v.i.
21. to make a bargain; come to terms; compromise.
22. to settle a debt, claim, etc., by compromise.
23. to form a compound.
[1350-1400; (v.) ME compounen < MF compon- (s. of compondre) < L componere, equiv. to com- COM- + ponere to put; (adj.) ME compouned, ptp. of compounen, as above]
compound2
/kom"pownd/, n.
1. (in the Far East) an enclosure containing residences, business offices, or other establishments of Europeans.
2. (in Africa) a similar enclosure for native laborers.
3. any enclosure, esp. for prisoners of war.
4. any separate cluster of homes, often owned by members of the same family.
[1670-80; alter., by assoc. with COMPOUND1, of Malay kampung village, collection, gathering; cf. KAMPONG]

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I
Any substance composed of identical molecules consisting of atoms of two or more elements.

Millions are known, each unique, with unique properties. Most common materials are mixtures of compounds. Pure compounds can be obtained by physical separation methods, such as precipitation and distillation. Compounds can be broken down into their constituents to various degrees or changed into new compounds by chemical reactions. Atoms always combine into molecules in fixed proportions, distinguishing compounds from solutions and other mechanical mixtures. Compounds are often classified as inorganic and organic compounds; coordination complexes, which contain metal atoms (usually transition elements) bonded to ligands that may be organic, are somewhat in between. Compounds may also be classified by whether they have ionic or covalent bonds (many include both types).
II
(as used in expressions)

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Universalium. 2010.

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  • compound — [ kɔ̃pund ] adj. inv. et n. • 1874; mot angl. « composé » ♦ Anglic. Machine compound, ou n. f. une compound : machine à vapeur à plusieurs cylindres dans lesquels la vapeur agit alternativement. Électrotechn. Excitation compound : excitation d… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Compound — Com pound, a. [OE. compouned, p. p. of compounen. See {Compound}, v. t.] Composed of two or more elements, ingredients, parts; produced by the union of several ingredients, parts, or things; composite; as, a compound word. [1913 Webster] Compound …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Compound — may refer to: Chemical compounds, combinations of two or more elements Compound (enclosure), a cluster of buildings having a shared purpose, usually inside a fence or wall Compound (fortification), a version of the above fortified with defensive… …   Wikipedia

  • Compound — Com pound, n. 1. That which is compounded or formed by the union or mixture of elements ingredients, or parts; a combination of simples; a compound word; the result of composition. Shak. [1913 Webster] Rare compound of oddity, frolic, and fun.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • compound — com·pound /kəm pau̇nd/ vt 1: to agree for a consideration not to prosecute (an offense) ◇ Compounding a felony is a common law crime. 2: to pay (interest) on both the accrued interest and the principal Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam …   Law dictionary

  • compound — compound1 [käm pound′, käm′pound΄; kəm pound′; ] for adj.usually & for n.always [, käm′pound΄] vt. [ME compounen < OFr compon(d)re, to arrange, direct < L componere, to put together: see COMPOSITE] 1. to mix or combine 2. to make by… …   English World dictionary

  • Compound — Com*pound (k[o^]m*pound ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Compounded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Compounding}.] [OE. componen, compounen, L. componere, compositum; com + ponere to put set. The d is excrescent. See {Position}, and cf. {Compon[ e]}.] 1. To form or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • compound — com‧pound [kəmˈpaʊnd ǁ kɑːmˈpaʊnd, ˈkɑːmpaʊnd] verb [transitive] FINANCE to pay interest on both a sum of money and the interest already earned on it: • My bank compounds interest quarterly. * * * Ⅰ. compound UK US /ˈkɒmpaʊnd/ adjective FINANCE ► …   Financial and business terms

  • compound — s.n. 1. Mod de grupare a două mecanisme, maşini etc. pentru a asigura funcţionarea lor asociată. 2. Masă electroizolantă constituită dintr un amestec de materiale electroizolante organice. [pr.: páund] – cuv. engl. Trimis de LauraGellner,… …   Dicționar Român

  • Compound — Com*pound , v. i. To effect a composition; to come to terms of agreement; to agree; to settle by a compromise; usually followed by with before the person participating, and for before the thing compounded or the consideration. [1913 Webster] Here …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Compound 48/80 — is a polymer produced by the condensation of N methyl p methoxyphenethylamine with formaldehyde.[1] It promotes histamine release.[2] In biochemical research, compound 48/80 is used to promote mast cell degranulation. References ^ …   Wikipedia


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