art deco


art deco
a style of decorative art developed originally in the 1920s with a revival in the 1960s, marked chiefly by geometric motifs, curvilinear forms, sharply defined outlines, often bold colors, and the use of synthetic materials, as plastics.
Also, Art Deco. Also called deco, Deco.
[1965-70; < F Art Déco, shortened from Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes, an exposition of modern decorative and industrial arts held in Paris, France, in 1925]

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or Style Moderne

Movement in design, interior decoration, and architecture in the 1920s and '30s in Europe and the U.S. The name derives from the Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes in Paris in 1925.

Its products included both individually crafted luxury items and mass-produced wares, but, in either case, the intention was to create a sleek and antitraditional elegance that symbolized wealth and sophistication. Influenced by Art Nouveau, Bauhaus, Cubist, Native American, and Egyptian sources, the distinguishing features of the style are simple, clean shapes, often with a "streamlined" look; ornament that is geometric or stylized from representational forms; and unusually varied, often expensive materials, which frequently include man-made substances (plastics, especially bakelite; vita-glass; and ferroconcrete) in addition to natural ones (jade, silver, ivory, obsidian, chrome, and rock crystal). Typical motifs included stylized animals, foliage, nude female figures, and sun rays. New York City's Rockefeller Center (especially its interiors supervised by Donald Deskey), the Chrysler Building by William Van Alen, and the Empire State Building by Shreve, Lamb & Harmon are the most monumental embodiments of Art Deco.

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▪ art movement
also called  style moderne  

      movement in the decorative arts and architecture (Western architecture) that originated in the 1920s and developed into a major style in western Europe and the United States during the 1930s. Its name was derived from the Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes, held in Paris in 1925, where the style was first exhibited. Art Deco design represented modernism turned into fashion. Its products included both individually crafted luxury items and mass-produced wares, but, in either case, the intention was to create a sleek and antitraditional elegance that symbolized wealth and sophistication.

      The distinguishing features of the style are simple, clean shapes, often with a “streamlined” look; ornament that is geometric or stylized from representational forms; and unusually varied, often expensive materials, which frequently include man-made substances (plastics, especially bakelite; vita-glass; and ferroconcrete) in addition to natural ones (jade, silver, ivory, obsidian, chrome, and rock crystal). Though Art Deco objects were rarely mass-produced, the characteristic features of the style reflected admiration for the modernity of the machine and for the inherent design qualities of machine-made objects (e.g., relative simplicity, planarity, symmetry, and unvaried repetition of elements).

 Among the formative influences on Art Deco were Art Nouveau, the Bauhaus, Cubism, and Sergey Diaghilev's Ballets Russes. Decorative ideas came from American Indian, Egyptian, and early classical sources as well as from nature. Characteristic motifs included nude female figures, animals, foliage, and sunrays, all in conventionalized forms.

 Most of the outstanding Art Deco creators designed individually crafted or limited-edition items. They included the furniture designers Jacques Ruhlmann and Maurice Dufrène; the architect Eliel Saarinen; metalsmith Jean Puiforcat; glass and jewelry designer René Lalique; fashion designer Erté; artist-jewelers Raynmond Templier, Jean Fouquet René Robert, H.G. Murphy, and Wiwen Nilsson; and the figural sculptor Chiparus. The fashion designer Paul Poiret (Poiret, Paul) and the graphic artist Edward McKnight Kauffer represent those whose work directly reached a larger audience. New York City's Rockefeller Center (especially its interiors supervised by Donald Deskey (Deskey, Donald)), the Chrysler Building by William Van Alen, and the Empire State Building by Shreve, Lamb & Harmon are the most monumental embodiments of Art Deco. Although the style went out of fashion during World War II, beginning in the late 1960s there was a renewed interest in Art Deco design.
 

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Art déco — Art déco …   Deutsch Wörterbuch

  • Art-déco — Flèche du Chrysler Building, New York. De 1920 à 1939, et en réaction à l Art nouveau d avant la Première Guerre mondiale, l Art déco fut un mouvement artistique extrêmement influent surtout dans l architecture et le design …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Art Déco — Flèche du Chrysler Building, New York. De 1920 à 1939, et en réaction à l Art nouveau d avant la Première Guerre mondiale, l Art déco fut un mouvement artistique extrêmement influent surtout dans l architecture et le design …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Art deco — Art déco Flèche du Chrysler Building, New York. De 1920 à 1939, et en réaction à l Art nouveau d avant la Première Guerre mondiale, l Art déco fut un mouvement artistique extrêmement influent surtout dans l architecture et le design …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Art decó — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Coronamiento art decó del Edificio Chrysler en Nueva York, construido 1928–1930 …   Wikipedia Español

  • Art déco — Art dé|co 〈[a:r de:ko] f.; ; unz.〉 dem Jugendstil folgende Stilrichtung in der Kunst u. bes. im Kunstgewerbe von etwa 1920 bis 1940 [verkürzt <frz. art décorative „dekorative Kunst“] * * * Art dé|co [arde ko: ], der u. das; [frz. art… …   Universal-Lexikon

  • ART DECO —    Art Deco is a uniquely urban style of architecture that celebrated modernity. In some respects it was modeled on the sleek, streamlined modern architecture found in Europe, such as the Bauhaus or the International style; but rather than these… …   Historical Dictionary of Architecture

  • Art decó — art déco (fr.; pronunc. [árt decó]) m. Estilo artístico aplicado a las artes decorativas, con influencias del modernismo, que surge en Europa en los años veinte. * * * El art decó es un movimiento artístico centrado sobre todo en el campo de las… …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • art déco — art dé·co loc.s.f.inv. ES fr. {{wmetafile0}} TS arte movimento artistico nato intorno al 1920 che prediligeva le simmetrie e le forme stilizzate e geometriche; anche agg.inv.: una vetrata art déco Sinonimi: déco. {{line}} {{/line}} ETIMO: in. XX… …   Dizionario italiano

  • Art Deco — UK / US or Art Deco UK [ˌɑː(r)t ˈdekəʊ] / US [ˌɑrt ˈdekʊ] noun [uncountable] art a style of art, decoration, and architecture with simple strong lines that was especially popular in the 1920s and 1930s in Europe and the US …   English dictionary

  • art deco — UK / US or Art Deco UK [ˌɑː(r)t ˈdekəʊ] / US [ˌɑrt ˈdekʊ] noun [uncountable] art a style of art, decoration, and architecture with simple strong lines that was especially popular in the 1920s and 1930s in Europe and the US …   English dictionary


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