Large Hadron Collider


Large Hadron Collider

device
 world's most powerful particle accelerator. The LHC was constructed by the European Organization for Nuclear Research ( CERN) in the same 27-km (17-mile) tunnel that houses its Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP). The tunnel is circular and is located 50–175 metres (165–575 feet) below ground, on the border between France and Switzerland. The LHC ran its first test operation on Sept. 10, 2008.

      The heart of the LHC is a ring that runs through the circumference of the LEP tunnel; the ring is only a few centimetres in diameter, evacuated to a higher degree than deep space and cooled to within two degrees of absolute zero. In this ring, two counter-rotating beams of heavy ions (ion) or protons (proton) are accelerated to speeds within one millionth of a percent of the speed of light. (Protons belong to a category of heavy subatomic particles (subatomic particle) known as hadrons (hadron), which accounts for the name of this particle accelerator.) At four points on the ring, the beams can intersect and a small proportion of particles crash into each other. At maximum power, collisions between protons will take place at a combined energy of up to 14 tetra-electron volts (TeV; 14 × 1012 electron volts (electron volt)), about seven times greater than has been achieved previously. At each collision point are huge magnets weighing tens of thousands of tons and banks of detectors to collect the particles produced by the collisions.

      The project took a quarter of a century to realize; planning began in 1984, and the final go-ahead was granted in 1994. Thousands of scientists and engineers from dozens of countries were involved in designing, planning, and building the LHC, and the cost for materials and manpower was nearly $5 billion; this does not include the cost of running experiments and computers.

      One goal of the LHC project is to understand the fundamental structure of matter by recreating the extreme conditions that occurred in the first few moments of the universe according to the big bang model (big-bang model). For decades physicists have used the so-called standard model for fundamental particles, which has worked well but has weaknesses. First, and most important, it does not explain why some particles have mass. In the 1960s British physicist Peter Higgs postulated a particle that had interacted with other particles at the beginning of time to provide them with their mass. The Higgs particle has never been observed—it should be produced only by collisions in an energy range not available for experiments before the LHC. Second, the standard model requires some arbitrary assumptions, which some physicists have suggested may be resolved by postulating a further class of supersymmetric particles—these might be produced by the extreme energies of the LHC. Finally, examination of asymmetries between particles and their antiparticles (antiparticle) may provide a clue to another mystery: the imbalance between matter and antimatter in the universe.

      As with all groundbreaking experiments, the most exciting results may well be unexpected ones. As British physicist Stephen Hawking (Hawking, Stephen W.) said, “It is more exciting if we don't find the Higgs. That will show that something is wrong and we need to think again.”

David G.C. Jones
 

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Universalium. 2010.

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