documentary film


documentary film

 motion picture that shapes and interprets factual material for purposes of education or entertainment. Documentaries have been made in one form or another in nearly every country and have contributed significantly to the development of realism in films. John Grierson (Grierson, John), a Scottish educator who had studied mass communication in the United States, adapted the term in the mid-1920s from the French word documentaire. The documentary-style film, though, had been popular from the earliest days of filmmaking. In Russia, events of the Bolshevik ascent to power in 1917–18 were filmed, and the pictures were used as propaganda. In 1922 the American director Robert Flaherty (Flaherty, Robert) presented Nanook of the North, a record of Eskimo life based on personal observation, which was the prototype of many documentary films. At about the same time, the British director H. Bruce Woolfe reconstructed battles of World War I in a series of compilation films, a type of documentary that bases an interpretation of history on factual news material. The German Kulturfilme, such as the feature-length film Wege zu Kraft und Schönheit (1925; Ways to Health and Beauty), were in international demand.

      The British (United Kingdom) documentary film movement, led by Grierson, influenced world film production in the 1930s by such films as Grierson's Drifters (1929), a description of the British herring fleet, and Night Mail (1936), about the nightly mail train from London to Glasgow. The United States, too, made significant contributions to the genre. Early examples include two films directed by Pare Lorentz: (Lorentz, Pare) The Plow That Broke the Plains (1936), set in America's dust bowl, and The River (1937), a discussion of flood control.

      The production of documentaries was stimulated by World War II. The Nazi government of wartime Germany used the nationalized film industry to produce propaganda documentaries. The American director Frank Capra presented the Why We Fight (1942–45) series for the U.S. Army Signal Corps; Great Britain released London Can Take It (1940), Target for Tonight (1941), and Desert Victory (1943); and the National Film Board of Canada turned out educational films in the national interest.

      In the early 1950s attention once again focused on the documentary in the British free cinema movement, led by a group of young filmmakers concerned with the individual and his everyday experience. Documentaries also became popular in television programming, especially in the late 1960s and the early 1970s. See also cinéma vérité.

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Universalium. 2010.

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