Compton Gamma Ray Observatory


Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

▪ United States satellite
 U.S. satellite, one of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) “Great Observatories” satellites, which is designed to identify the sources of celestial gamma rays (gamma ray). In operation from 1991 to 1999, it was named in honour of Arthur Holly Compton (Compton, Arthur Holly), one of the pioneers of high-energy physics.

      In the late 1960s and early 1970s, satellites built to detect nuclear explosions by emitted gamma rays yielded many false reports. It was realized that momentary random “bursts” of gamma radiation wash across the solar system from sources beyond. The primary objective of CGRO was to determine whether these gamma-ray bursts (gamma-ray burster) are within the Milky Way Galaxy and of modest energy or are in remote galaxies and of extreme energy.

      The 16-ton satellite was deployed by the space shuttle on April 11, 1991. Four instruments spanned the energy range from 20 keV (kiloelectron volts, or thousand electron volts) to the observable limit of 30 GeV (gigaelectron volts, or billion electron volts). A spectrometer measured the gamma rays in the range 0.5–10 MeV (megaelectron volts, or million electron volts) by the optical flash produced by their passage through a scintillation detector (scintillation counter). The spectrometer had poor spatial resolution, but, by measuring spectral lines from radioactive decay, it could identify the chemical composition of the gamma-ray sources. Two planar arrays of scintillation detectors set 1.5 metres (5 feet) apart provided sky images with an angular resolution of 2°, which was excellent for a telescope at this energy. Eight other scintillation detectors (one at each corner of the satellite) that were sensitive from 10 keV to 2 MeV had sufficient temporal resolution to trace the “light curve” of a gamma-ray flash lasting only a few milliseconds. In addition, a telescope incorporating a spark chamber that was an order of magnitude larger and more sensitive than any previously flown mapped the sky at energies of 1–30 MeV.

      Through CGRO's instruments, the gamma-ray bursts were seen to be scattered evenly throughout the sky. This proved that the bursts were at cosmological distances, because, if they were from events in the Milky Way Galaxy, they would have appeared predominantly in the galactic plane. This result (when integrated with data from later satellites such as the Italian-Dutch BeppoSAX and with post-burst observations at optical wavelengths) proved that the bursts result from exceedingly violent events in galaxies, some of which are extremely distant.

      In addition, CGRO also made significant observations of supermassive black holes (black hole) in active galaxies; quasars (quasar); blazars (a class of newly discovered quasars that shine brightest in the gamma-ray range); stellar-mass black holes and neutron stars (neutron star) produced when stars destroy themselves in supernova explosions; and supernova remnants.

      After one of CGRO's gyroscopes failed in November 1999, NASA decided to deorbit the satellite, and it reentered the atmosphere on June 4, 2000.

David M. Harland
 

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Universalium. 2010.

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