Welf dynasty


Welf dynasty
Dynasty of German nobles and rulers.

They descended from Count Welf of Bavaria (early 9th century), whose daughters married Louis I the Pious and Louis the German. The Welfs were linked to the House of Este in the 11th century. They supported the papal party against Emperor Henry IV and were rivals of the Hohenstaufens in central Europe and in Italy (where their name was Guelpho; see Guelphs and Ghibellines). As part of the House of Hanover, they became rulers of Britain.

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▪ German history
English  Guelf , or  Guelph , Italian  Guelpho 

      dynasty of German nobles and rulers who were the chief rivals of the Hohenstaufens (Hohenstaufen dynasty) in Italy and central Europe in the Middle Ages and who later included the Hanoverian Welfs, who, with the accession of George I to the British throne, became rulers of Great Britain.

      The origin of the “Elder House” of Welf is a matter of controversy, since Welf in the Carolingian period seems to have been rather widespread as a baptismal name. The first clearly discernible ancestor of the dynasty is the Count Welf who had possessions in Bavaria in the first quarter of the 9th century and whose daughters Judith and Emma married, respectively, the Frankish emperor Louis I the Pious and the East Frankish king Louis the German. The best analyses of the evidence trace the Burgundian and the Swabian Welfs to two nephews of Judith and Emma, namely Conrad (d. c. 876) and the so-numbered Welf I (d. before 876). Conrad's son Rudolf (d. 911 or 912) became king of Burgundy in 888, and this kingdom remained with his descendants until 1032. Welf II (d. 1030), who was probably of the fifth generation from Welf I, had so strong a position in southern Germany that he and his son Welf III could occasionally defy the German kings.

      Welf III was enfeoffed as duke of Carinthia in 1047, but died in 1055. His German possessions then passed to his nephew Welf IV (d. 1107), whose father was Alberto Azzo II of the House of Este (Este, House of) (q.v.). Welf IV began the “Younger House” of Welf.

      Welf IV became duke of Bavaria as Welf I, in 1070. He abandoned his alliance with the Holy Roman emperor Henry IV to become an important supporter of the papal party in Italy. His 17-year-old son, Welf V (later Welf II of Bavaria), married the 43-year-old countess Matilda of Tuscany in 1089; the marriage ended in separation. The elder Welf thereupon appealed to Henry IV for help against Matilda. Henry attacked Matilda's castle in Nogara, south of Verona, but abandoned the siege when Matilda's army counterattacked. The Este family tried, in Welf V's name, to claim Matilda's lands after her death but were unsuccessful.

      The Duchy of Bavaria passed, in 1156, to Henry the Lion, who held it until his downfall in 1180. Bavaria and Saxony, with great inheritances by marriages, made the Welfs the most potent rivals of the Hohenstaufen kings and emperors.

      The German king and Holy Roman emperor Otto IV was a son of Henry the Lion. The Welf kingship collapsed with him; but the tradition of Welf hostility to the Hohenstaufen emperors led to the Italian use of a form of the name for a supporter of the papacy against the emperor (see Guelf and Ghibelline). Reconciliation between Welfs and Hohenstaufens was achieved in 1235, when the emperor Frederick II enfeoffed Otto IV's grandson, Otto the Child (d. 1252) with the duchy of Brunswick-Lüneburg, a shrunken remnant of what his ancestors had held in Saxony.

      In later times the Hanoverian Welfs attained the status of electors of the Holy Roman Empire (1692), kings of Great Britain (1714), and kings of Hanover (1814). The Russian emperor Ivan VI was a Welf of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel through his father.

      The British sovereignty of the Welfs ended with Victoria. The descendants of her uncle Ernest Augustus lost Hanover in the Seven Weeks' War of 1866. They ought to have inherited Brunswick (-Wolfenbüttel) in 1884, but because they refused to acknowledge their loss of right to Hanover, the duke of Cumberland Ernest Augustus (1845–1923) was prevented from taking possession. After the marriage of his son Ernest Augustus (1887–1953) to Victoria Louise, daughter of the German emperor William II, they reigned over Brunswick alone until in the revolution after World War I they were forced to abdicate.

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Universalium. 2010.

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