paint


paint
paintable, adj.paintless, adj.
/paynt/, n.
1. a substance composed of solid coloring matter suspended in a liquid medium and applied as a protective or decorative coating to various surfaces, or to canvas or other materials in producing a work of art.
2. an application of this.
3. the dried surface pigment: Don't scuff the paint.
4. the solid coloring matter alone; pigment.
5. facial cosmetics, esp. lipstick, rouge, etc., designed to heighten natural color.
6. Chiefly Western U.S. a pied, calico, or spotted horse or pony; pinto.
v.t.
7. to coat, cover, or decorate (something) with paint: to paint a fence.
8. to produce (a picture, design, etc.) in paint: to paint a portrait.
9. to represent in paint, as in oils, tempera, or watercolor: to paint an actress as the Muse of tragedy.
10. to depict as if by painting; describe vividly in words: The ads painted the resort as a winter wonderland.
11. to color by or as if by painting: Sunset painted the clouds pink.
12. to apply a substance to, as a liquid medicine or a cosmetic: to paint a cut with iodine.
v.i.
13. to coat or cover anything with paint.
14. to engage in painting as an art: She has begun to paint in her spare time.
15. to put on or use facial cosmetics.
16. paint the town red, Informal. to celebrate boisterously, esp. by making a round of stops at bars and nightclubs. Also, paint the town.
[1200-50; ME peinten (v.) < OF peint, ptp. of peindre < L pingere to paint; see PICTURE]

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I
Decorative and protective coating commonly applied to rigid surfaces as a liquid consisting of a pigment suspended in a vehicle, or binder.

The vehicle, usually a resin dissolved in a solvent, dries to a tough film, binding the pigment to the surface. Paint was used for pictorial and decorative purposes in the caves of France and Spain as early as 15,000 BC.
II
(as used in expressions)
Old Museum of Painting
Hill painting
still life painting

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▪ chemical product
      decorative and protective coating commonly applied to rigid surfaces as a liquid consisting of a pigment suspended in a vehicle, or binder. The vehicle, usually a resin dissolved in a solvent, dries to a tough film, binding the pigment to the surface.

      Paint was used for pictorial and decorative purposes in the caves of France and Spain as early as 15,000 BC. The earliest pigments, which were natural ores such as iron oxide, were supplemented by 6000 BC in China by calcined (fired) mixtures of inorganic compounds and organic pigments; vehicles were prepared from gum arabic, egg white, gelatin, and beeswax. By 1500 BC the Egyptians were using dyes such as indigo and madder to make blue and red pigments. The exploitation of linseed oil (a drying oil useful as a vehicle) and zinc oxide (a white pigment) in the 18th century brought a rapid expansion of the European paint industry. The 20th century saw important developments in paint technology, including the introduction of synthetic polymers as vehicles and of synthetic pigments; a new understanding of the chemistry and physics of paints; and coating materials with greater fire retardancy, corrosion resistance, and heat stability. Most significant was a return to water-based paints in the form of latex paints that combine easy application and cleanup with reduced hazard of fire.

      In modern paint manufacture, pigment particles are dispersed in the vehicle by cylindrical mills that tumble heavy metal or ceramic balls through the paint, or by sand grinders that circulate a suspension of sand through the paint at high speed.

      The basic white pigments include zinc oxide, zinc sulfide, lithopone, and titanium dioxide. Most black pigments are composed of elemental carbon. Common red pigments include the minerals iron oxide, cadmium, and cuprous oxide and various synthetic organic pigments. Yellow and orange pigments include chromates, molybdates, and cadmium compounds. Blue and green pigments are either inorganic (synthetic ultramarines and iron blues) or organic (phthalocyanines). Extenders or fillers are sometimes added to paint to increase its spreadability and strength.

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Paint — (p[=a]nt), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Painted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Painting}.] [OE. peinten, fr. F. peint, p. p. of peindre to paint, fr. L. pingere, pictum; cf. Gr. poiki los many colored, Skr. pi[,c] to adorn. Cf. {Depict}, {Picture}, {Pigment}, {Pint} …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • paint — [pānt] vt. [ME peinten < OFr peint, pp. of peindre < L pingere, to paint, embroider < IE base * peig , to mark by scratching or coloring > Gr pikros, sharp, OE fah, stained] 1. a) to make (a picture, design, etc.) in colors applied to …   English World dictionary

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  • Paint — Paint, PA U.S. borough in Pennsylvania Population (2000): 1103 Housing Units (2000): 432 Land area (2000): 0.349878 sq. miles (0.906180 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 0.349878 sq. miles… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

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  • Paint — Paint, n. 1. (a) A pigment or coloring substance. (b) The same prepared with a vehicle, as oil, water with gum, or the like, for application to a surface. [1913 Webster] 2. A cosmetic; rouge. Praed. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Paint-in — 〈[pɛıntı̣n] n. 15; Mal.〉 Ausstellung, in der das Publikum selbst Bilder malen kann [<engl. paint „malen“ + in „darin“] …   Universal-Lexikon


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