moose


moose
/moohs/, n., pl. moose.
1. a large, long-headed mammal, Alces alces, of the deer family, having circumpolar distribution in the Northern Hemisphere, the male of which has enormous palmate antlers.
2. (cap.) a member of a fraternal and benevolent organization (Loyal Order of Moose).
[1595-1605, Amer.; < Eastern Abenaki mos, reinforced by cognates in other Algonquian languages, all < Proto-Algonquian *mo·swa]

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Largest species (Alces alces) in the deer family (Cervidae), found in northern North America and Eurasia.

It is called elk in Europe. Moose have long legs, a bulbous and mobile muzzle, short neck and tail, and a brown, shaggy, coarse coat. They stand 5–7 ft (1.5–2 m) tall and weigh up to 1,800 lb (820 kg). Males have enormous flattened, tined antlers that are shed and regrown annually. Moose wade in forest-edged lakes and streams, eating submerged aquatic plants, and browse on leaves, twigs, and bark. They are usually solitary, but North American moose often assemble in bands in winter. They range throughout the Canadian coniferous forests and those of the northern U.S. They have been protected from extermination by regulation of hunting. See also wapiti.

Bull moose (Alces alces) in velvet

© Leonard Lee Rue III
Photo Researchers, Inc.

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mammal
 the largest member of the deer family Cervidae (order Artiodactyla (artiodactyl)). Moose are striking in appearance due to their towering size, black colour, tall legs, pendulous muzzle, and dangling hairy dewlap (called a bell) and the immense, wide, flat antlers of old bulls. The name moose is common in North America; it is derived from the word moosh (“stripper and eater of bark”) in the Algonquian language (Algonquian languages) of the Montagnais ( Innu) Indians of Quebec, Can. In Europe, moose are called elk.

 Moose inhabit the northern parts of North America and Eurasia. A European and west Siberian form and an American and east Siberian form can be distinguished by pelage and antler characteristics. The differences in regional body sizes reflect adjustment to local conditions and not the existence of genetically distinct subspecies. The largest moose specimens are found in Alaska and eastern Siberia; there bulls weigh 600 kg (1,300 pounds) and stand 2 metres (7 feet) at the shoulder. The smallest moose are found in its southernmost populations in Wyoming and Manchuria, where large bulls weigh 300–350 kg (660–770 pounds).

  Moose primarily exploit plant communities of deciduous shrubs that have been disturbed by flooding, avalanches, or forest fires. They are avid visitors to mineral licks. In winter they may also avidly consume conifers such as fir and yew. In areas of very deep snow, moose may tramp a system of trails called a “moose yard.” In summer they may also consume large amounts of aquatic vegetation. The large, mobile, sensitive muzzle appears to be a specialized feeding organ that allows moose to exploit the large stocks of submerged aquatic vegetation in shallow lakes and streams. Moose may dive and stay up to 50 seconds underwater while feeding. Even calves are excellent swimmers.

 Moose are bold and readily defend themselves against large carnivores. During calving season, moose cows face grizzly (grizzly bear) and black bears (black bear). In late winter when the snow is deep and moose cannot flee, they defend themselves against wolf packs. They choose hard, level ground with little snow for maneuverability, such as ridges blown free of snow or frozen lakes with a thin cover of snow. When hindered by deep snow, they back into dense conifers to protect their vulnerable inguinal region and lower haunches from attacks by wolves. They may then charge the wolves and attack them by slapping them with their front legs and kicking them with their hind legs. These blows are powerful enough to kill wolves.

      Moose have killed humans. In Siberia, hunters armed with muzzle-loading guns feared wounded moose far more than they feared the large brown bear. Due to the thick skin on its head and neck and its dense skull, an attacking moose could not be readily stopped with a small, round rifle ball of soft lead.

 Moose normally escape predators by trotting at high speed, which forces the pursuing smaller predators into expensive and tiring jumping but which costs a moose relatively little energy. It readily comes to bay but on its terms: it chooses low water where wolves are hampered in their movements. Although moose are excellent swimmers, it does not choose deeper water, because northern wolves have relatively large paws and so are also excellent swimmers. Predation by wolves and bears removes the infirm but may also severely deplete healthy calves, despite the spirited defense of their mothers.

      Moose mate in September so that the calves may be born in June to take advantage of spring vegetation. The antlers are shed of the blood-engorged skin called velvet in late August, and the bulls are in rut by the first week of September. Rutting bulls search widely for females, but the bulls may also attract females with the smell of their urine. They paw rutting pits with their forelegs, urinate into them, and splash the urine-soaked muck onto their hairy bells. Cows in turn may call to attract bulls. Actively rutting bulls appear to receive more than 50 punctures per mating season, but they are protected by a thick skin on the front and the neck. Rutting is expensive, as bulls lose virtually all of their body fat and their festering wounds must heal.

      Because of their large body size, moose have a long gestation period of about 230 days. Twins are not uncommon. The young are born tan in colour, which contrasts sharply with the dark colour of adults. They grow very fast but still require maternal protection against wolves in winter. They are driven off by their mother shortly before she gives birth again. The dispersed yearlings roam in search of new living space.

      Young calf moose in human hands tame readily and emerge as surprisingly intelligent, mischievous, but utterly loyal creatures. As mounts and beasts of burden, moose are superior to horses in muskeg and taiga. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, moose became scarce owing to severe exploitation in unsettled times in Eurasia and to uncontrolled market hunting in North America. However, they responded readily to protection and management. Today moose are abundant in Eurasia and North America and are a cherished game animal. (The muzzle of the moose is considered a delicacy.) However, with the restoration of a predator fauna in North America, moose are again declining.

Valerius Geist
 

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:
, (Cervus alces or Alces malchis)


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