law of large numbers


law of large numbers
the theorem in probability theory that the number of successes increases as the number of experiments increases and approximates the probability times the number of experiments for a large number of experiments.
[1935-40]

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      in statistics, the theorem that, as the number of identically distributed, randomly generated variables increases, their sample mean (average) approaches their theoretical mean.

      The law of large numbers was first proved by the Swiss mathematician Jakob Bernoulli (Bernoulli, Jakob) in 1713. He and his contemporaries were developing a formal probability theory with a view toward analyzing games of chance. Bernoulli envisaged an endless sequence of repetitions of a game of pure chance with only two outcomes, a win or a loss. Labeling the probability of a win p, Bernoulli considered the fraction of times that such a game would be won in a large number of repetitions. It was commonly believed that this fraction should eventually be close to p. This is what Bernoulli proved in a precise manner by showing that, as the number of repetitions increases indefinitely, the probability of this fraction being within any prespecified distance from p approaches 1.

      There is also a more general version of the law of large numbers for averages, proved more than a century later by the Russian mathematician Pafnuty Chebyshev (Chebyshev, Pafnuty Lvovich).

 The law of large numbers is closely related to what is commonly called the law of averages. In coin tossing, the law of large numbers stipulates that the fraction of heads will eventually be close to 1/2. Hence, if the first 10 tosses produce only 3 heads, it seems that some mystical force must somehow increase the probability of a head, producing a return of the fraction of heads to its ultimate limit of 1/2. Yet the law of large numbers requires no such mystical force. Indeed, the fraction of heads can take a very long time to approach 1/2(see figure—>). For example, to obtain a 95 percent probability that the fraction of heads falls between 0.47 and 0.53, the number of tosses must exceed 1,000. In other words, after 1,000 tosses, an initial shortfall of only 3 heads out of 10 tosses is swamped by results of the remaining 990 tosses.

Richard Routledge
 

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Universalium. 2010.

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