fertilizer


fertilizer
/ferr"tl uy'zeuhr/, n.
1. any substance used to fertilize the soil, esp. a commercial or chemical manure.
2. a person, insect, etc., that fertilizes an animal or plant: Bees are fertilizers of flowers.
[1655-65; FERTILIZE + -ER1]

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Natural or artificial substance containing the chemical elements that improve growth and productiveness of plants.

Fertilizers enhance the natural fertility of the soil or replace the chemical elements taken from the soil by previous crops. The use of manure and composts as fertilizers is probably almost as old as agriculture. Modern chemical fertilizers include one or more of the three elements most important in plant nutrition: nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. Of secondary importance are the elements sulfur, magnesium, and calcium.

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      natural or artificial substance containing the chemical elements that improve growth and productiveness of plants. Fertilizers enhance the natural fertility of the soil or replace the chemical elements taken from the soil by previous crops.

      A brief treatment of fertilizer follows. For full treatment, see history of agriculture: New fertilizers (agriculture, origins of); agricultural technology:Fertilizing and conditioning the soil (agricultural technology).

      The use of manure and composts as fertilizers is probably almost as old as agriculture. Modern chemical fertilizers include one or more of the three elements that are most important in plant nutrition: nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. Of secondary importance are the elements sulfur, magnesium, and calcium.

      Most nitrogen fertilizers are obtained from synthetic ammonia; (ammonia) this chemical compound (NH3) is used either as a gas or in a water solution, or it is converted into salts such as ammonium sulfate, ammonium nitrate, and ammonium phosphate, but packinghouse wastes, treated garbage, sewage, and manure are also common sources of it. Phosphorus fertilizers include calcium phosphate derived from phosphate rock or bones. The more soluble superphosphate and triple superphosphate preparations are obtained by the treatment of calcium phosphate with sulfuric and phosphoric acid, respectively. Potassium fertilizers, namely potassium chloride and potassium sulfate, are mined from potash deposits. Mixed fertilizers contain more than one of the three major nutrients—nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. Mixed fertilizers can be formulated in hundreds of ways.

      On modern farms a variety of machines are used to apply synthetic fertilizer in solid, gaseous, or liquid form. One type distributes anhydrous ammonia, a liquid under pressure, which becomes a nitrogenous gas when freed from pressure as it enters the soil. A metering device operates valves to release the liquid from the tank. Solid-fertilizer distributors have a wide hopper, with holes in the bottom; distribution is effected by various means, such as rollers, agitators, or endless chains traversing the hopper bottom. Broadcast distributors have a tub-shaped hopper from which the material falls onto revolving disks that distribute it in a broad swath. See also manure.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • fertilizer — UK US (UK also fertiliser) /ˈfɜːtɪlaɪzər/ noun [C or U] ► a chemical substance that is spread on land or soil to make plants grow better: »The prices for farm equipment, fertilizer and fuel climb relentlessly …   Financial and business terms

  • Fertilizer — Fer ti*lizer, n. 1. One who fertilizes; the agent that carries the fertilizing principle, as a moth to an orchid. A. R. Wallace. [1913 Webster] 2. That which renders fertile; a general name for commercial substances which make plants grow better …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fertilizer — 1660s, a person who fertilizes, agent noun from FERTILIZE (Cf. fertilize). As a euphemism for manure, from 1846 …   Etymology dictionary

  • fertilizer — (Amer.) fer·ti·liz·er || fÉœrtlaɪzÉ™(r) / fɜːtɪ n. person or thing which fertilizes; organic or chemical substance added to soil to enrich it (i.e. manure), fertiliser …   English contemporary dictionary

  • fertilizer — (izg. fȅrtilajzer) m DEFINICIJA agr. kemijsko sredstvo koje se koristi za povećanje plodnosti tla; umjetno gnojivo ETIMOLOGIJA engl., v. fertilan …   Hrvatski jezični portal

  • fertilizer — [n] dressing to aid production of crops buffalo chips*, compost, cow chips*, dung, guano, humus, manure, maul*, mulch, peat moss, plant food, potash, top dressing*; concepts 260,399,429 …   New thesaurus

  • fertilizer — (also fertiliser) ► NOUN ▪ a chemical or natural substance added to soil to increase its fertility …   English terms dictionary

  • fertilizer — [fʉrt′ lī΄zər] n. a person or thing that fertilizes; specif., any material, as manure, chemicals, etc., put on or in the soil to improve the quality or quantity of plant growth …   English World dictionary

  • Fertilizer — Tennessee Valley Authority: Results of Fertilizer demonstration 1942 …   Wikipedia

  • fertilizer — n. 1) to spread fertilizer 2) artificial; chemical; natural fertilizer * * * [ fɜːtɪlaɪzə] chemical natural fertilizer artificial to spread fertilizer …   Combinatory dictionary


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