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trigonometry table

trigonometry table

 tabulated values for some or all of the six trigonometric functions for various angular values. Once an essential tool for scientists, engineers, surveyors, and navigators, trigonometry tables became obsolete with the availability of computers. (For reference, the six trigonometric functions in relation to a right triangle are displayed in the figure—>.)

      The Greek astronomer Hipparchus (d. c. 127 BC) was the first to compose a table of trigonometric functions (based on the chords in a circle), which he calculated at increments of 7° 30′. Ptolemy (d. c. AD 145) improved on Hipparchus's tables by calculating the values at 30′ increments. Ptolemy's Almagest, the greatest astronomical work of antiquity, would be unimaginable without his table of chords.

      The earliest table of the sine function (although still not with its modern definition) is found in the Surya Siddhanta, a Hindu astronomical handbook from the 4th or 5th century AD.

      The astronomers of medieval Islam (Islāmic world) were consummate calculators who constructed tables of all six trigonometric functions as a basis for astronomy and astronomical timekeeping. The crown of this endeavour was Sultan Ulugh Beg (Ulūgh Beg)'s tables, published in 1440 in Samarkand (now in Uzbekistan). The sine and tangent functions (although still not given their modern definitions in terms of ratios), calculated at 1′ increments, were accurate to the equivalent of 9 decimal places.

      From Muslim Spain, trigonometric tables spread to Latin Europe. Regiomontanus (1436–76), German astronomer and mathematician, composed the first tables with decimal values. Similarly, Georg Joachim Rheticus (Rheticus, Georg Joachim) (1514–74), a student of Nicolaus Copernicus (Copernicus, Nicolaus), prepared a magnificent set of tables of all six trigonometric functions at 10″ increments accurate to 10 decimal places. Rheticus also took the decisive steps of defining the trigonometric functions in terms of angles rather than arcs and as ratios rather than lengths.

      The French mathematician François Viète (Viète, François, Seigneur De La Bigotiere) published tables of all six trigonometric functions in Canon Mathematicus (1579). The value of this work was not, however, in the tables, in which he calculated the functions at 1′ increments, accurate to five decimal places. Instead, Viète's work was important because he had discovered various trigonometry relationships with which he demonstrated how to use trigonometry to solve equations of degree three and higher. Henceforth, trigonometric tables were useful not only in surveying, astronomy, and navigation but in algebra as well.

      The climax for the construction of trigonometric tables in this period occurred with the German Bartholomeo Pitiscus. It was Pitiscus who coined the word trigonometry, and his Thesaurus Mathematicus (1615) contained tables of sines and cosines calculated at 10′ intervals that were accurate to 15 decimal places. Later, still more accurate tables were constructed with the help of logarithms, invented by John Napier (Napier, John) in 1614.

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Universalium. 2010.

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