self
/self/, n., pl. selves, adj., pron., pl. selves, v.
n.
1. a person or thing referred to with respect to complete individuality: one's own self.
2. a person's nature, character, etc.: his better self.
3. personal interest.
4. Philos.
a. the ego; that which knows, remembers, desires, suffers, etc., as contrasted with that known, remembered, etc.
b. the uniting principle, as a soul, underlying all subjective experience.
adj.
5. being the same throughout, as a color; uniform.
6. being of one piece with or the same material as the rest: drapes with a self lining.
7. Immunol. the natural constituents of the body, which are normally not subject to attack by components of the immune system (contrasted with nonself).
8. Obs. same.
9. myself, himself, herself, etc.: to make a check payable to self.
v.t., v.i.
10. to self-pollinate.
[bef. 900; ME; OE self, selfa; c. D zelf, G selb-, ON sjalfr, Goth silba]

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(as used in expressions)
Black Panther Party for Self Defense
self defense
Self Defense Force
self determination
self esteem
self fertilization
self heal
self incrimination

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      the “I” as experienced by an individual. In modern psychology the notion of the self has replaced earlier conceptions of the soul.

      The concept of the self has been a central feature of many personality theories, including those of Sigmund Freud, Alfred Adler, Carl Jung (Jung, Carl), Gordon W. Allport, Karen Horney, Carl Rogers, Rollo May, and Abraham H. Maslow.

      According to Carl Jung the self is a totality consisting of conscious and unconscious contents that dwarfs the ego (q.v.) in scope and intensity. The maturation of the self is the individuation process, which is the goal of the healthy personality.

      Rogers (Rogers, Carl R.) theorized that a person's self-concept determines his behaviour and his relation to the world, and that true therapeutic improvement occurs only when the individual changes his own self-concept. May's approach was similarly existential; he conceived the self as a dynamic entity, alive with potentiality. Maslow's (Maslow, Abraham H.) theory of self-actualization was based on a hierarchy of needs and emphasized the highest capacities or gratifications of a person. See also humanistic psychology.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Self — Self, n.; pl. {Selves}. 1. The individual as the object of his own reflective consciousness; the man viewed by his own cognition as the subject of all his mental phenomena, the agent in his own activities, the subject of his own feelings, and the …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • self- — ♦ Élément, de l angl. self « soi même ». ⇒ auto . self élément, de l angl. self, qui signifie soi même . ⇒SELF , élém. de compos. Élém. tiré de l angl. self « soi même », de même sens, entrant dans la constr. de subst. empr. à l angl. ou faits… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • self — self, the self In sociology, the concept of self is most frequently held to derive from the philosophies of Charles Horton Cooley , William James , and George Herbert Mead , and is the foundation of symbolic interactionism . It highlights the… …   Dictionary of sociology

  • self — self; self·dom; self·hood; self·ish·ness; self·ism; self·ist; self·less; self·ness; self·same·ness; thy·self; un·self; do it your·self; do it your·self·er; non·self; it·self; self·ish; self·ward; self·ish·ly; self·ward·ness; self·wards; …   English syllables

  • Self — объектно ориентированный, прототипный язык программирования, который задумывался как развитие языка Smalltalk. Разрабатывался в лаборатории Xerox PARC, а потом в Стэндфордском университете. Это была экспериментальная разработка, целью которой… …   Википедия

  • self — [ self ] (plural selves [ selvz ] ) noun *** count or uncount who you are and what you think and feel, especially the conscious feeling of being separate and different from other people: sense of self: Young babies do not have a fully developed… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • self — W3S2 [self] n plural selves [selvz] [: Old English;] 1.) [C usually singular] the type of person you are, your character, your typical behaviour etc sb s usual/normal self ▪ Sid was not his usual smiling self. be/look/feel (like) your old self… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • self — W3S2 [self] n plural selves [selvz] [: Old English;] 1.) [C usually singular] the type of person you are, your character, your typical behaviour etc sb s usual/normal self ▪ Sid was not his usual smiling self. be/look/feel (like) your old self… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • self- — is a highly productive prefix forming compounds of various types, in most of which self acts as the object on which the action or attribute signified by the second element operates, e.g. self betrayal (= betrayal of oneself), self awareness (=… …   Modern English usage

  • self- — [self] [ME < OE < self: see SELF] prefix 1. of oneself or itself: refers to the direct object of the implied transitive verb [self love, self restraint] 2. by oneself or itself: refers to the subject of the implied verb [self acting] 3. in …   English World dictionary

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