match
match1
/mach/, n.
1. a slender piece of wood, cardboard, or other flammable material tipped with a chemical substance that produces fire when rubbed on a rough or chemically prepared surface.
2. a wick, cord, or the like, prepared to burn at an even rate, used to fire cannon, gunpowder, etc.
[1350-1400; ME macche wick < MF meiche, OF mesche < VL *mesca lamp wick, metathetic var. of L myxa < Gk mýxa mucus, nostril, nozzle of a lamp]
match2
matchable, adj.matcher, n.
/mach/, n.
1. a person or thing that equals or resembles another in some respect.
2. a person or thing able to cope with another as an equal: to meet one's match.
3. a person or thing that is an exact counterpart of another.
4. a corresponding, suitably associated, or harmonious pair: The blue hat and green scarf were not a good match.
5. Sports.
a. a game or contest in which two or more contestants or teams oppose each other: a soccer match.
b. a contest consisting of a specific number of sets: a tennis match.
6. any contest or competition that resembles a sports match: a shouting match.
7. a person considered with regard to suitability as a partner in marriage: a good match.
8. a matrimonial union; marriage: Neither family approved of the match.
v.t.
9. to equal; be equal to: My talent does not match his.
10. to be the match or counterpart of; harmonize with: The skirt matches the jacket perfectly.
11. to cause to correspond; adapt: to match one's actions to one's beliefs.
12. to fit together, as two things: to match the pieces of a puzzle.
13. to fit (boards) together, side by side or end to end, with a tongue-and-groove or rabbeted joint.
14. to procure or produce an equal to: Try though we did, we could not match our first success.
15. to place in opposition or conflict: I matched my wits against his strength.
16. to provide with an adversary or competitor of equal power: The teams were well matched.
17. to encounter as an adversary with equal power.
18. to prove a match for.
19. to unite in marriage; procure a matrimonial alliance for.
20. to toss (coins) into the air and then compare the matching or contrasting sides that land facing up, as for determining the winner of a bet.
21. to match coins with.
v.i.
22. to be equal or suitable: Our talents match.
23. to correspond; be of corresponding size, shape, color, pattern, etc.: These gloves do not match.
24. Archaic. to ally oneself in marriage.
[bef. 900; ME macche, OE gemaecca mate, fellow]

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tinder
      splinter of wood, strip of cardboard, or other suitable flammable material tipped with a substance ignitable by friction.

      A match consists of three basic parts: a head, which initiates combustion; a tinder substance to pick up and transmit the flame; and a handle. There are two main types of modern friction matches: (1) strike-anywhere matches and (2) safety matches. The head of the strike-anywhere match contains all the chemicals necessary to obtain ignition from frictional heat, while the safety match has a head that ignites at a much higher temperature and must be struck on a specially prepared surface containing ingredients that pass ignition across to the head. The substance commonly used for obtaining combustion at the temperature of frictional heat is a compound of phosphorus. This substance is found in the head of strike-anywhere matches and in the striking surface of safety matches.

      In addition to the phosphoric igniting agent, three other main groups of chemicals are found in the match: (1) oxidizing agents, such as potassium chlorate, which supply oxygen to the igniting agent and the other combustible materials; (2) binders, such as animal glue, starches and gums, and synthetics, which bind the ingredients and are oxidized during combustion; post-combustion binders, such as ground glass, which fuse and hold the ash together, must also be used; and (3) inert materials, such as diatomaceous earth, which provide bulk and regulate the speed of reaction.

      Before the invention of matches, it was common to use specially made splinters tipped with some combustible substance, such as sulfur, to transfer a flame from one combustible source to another. An increased interest in chemistry led to experiments to produce fire by direct means on this splinter. Jean Chancel discovered in Paris in 1805 that splints tipped with potassium chlorate, sugar, and gum could be ignited by dipping them into sulfuric acid. Later workers refined this method, which culminated in the “promethean match” patented in 1828 by Samuel Jones of London. This consisted of a glass bead containing acid, the outside of which was coated with igniting composition. When the glass was broken by means of a small pair of pliers, or even with the user's teeth, the paper in which it was wrapped was set on fire. Other early matches, which could be both inconvenient and unsafe, involved bottles containing phosphorus and other substances. An example was François Derosne's briquet phosphorique (1816), which used a sulfur-tipped match to scrape inside a tube coated internally with phosphorus.

      These first matches were extremely difficult to ignite, and they frequently erupted in a shower of sparks. In addition, the smell was particularly offensive, and the warning printed on Jones's box (“Persons whose lungs are delicate should by no means use the Lucifers”) seems well founded.

      Economic conditions between 1825 and 1835 seem to have favoured the manufacture of matches as an industrial proposition, although the first suppliers fell back on nonphosphoric formulas—i.e., those based mostly on potassium-chlorate mixtures. The first friction matches were invented by John Walker (Walker, John E.), an English chemist and apothecary, whose ledger of April 7, 1827, records the first sale of such matches. Walker's “Friction Lights” had tips coated with a potassium chloride–antimony sulfide paste, which ignited when scraped between a fold of sandpaper. He never patented them. Nonphosphoric friction matches were being made by G.-E. Merkel of Paris and J. Siegal of Austria, among others, by 1832, by which time the manufacture of friction matches was well established in Europe.

      In 1831 Charles Sauria of France incorporated white, or yellow, phosphorus in his formula, an innovation quickly and widely copied. In 1835 Jànos Irinyi of Hungary replaced potassium chlorate with lead oxide and obtained matches that ignited quietly and smoothly.

      The discovery by the Austrian chemist Anton von Schrötter in 1845 of red phosphorus, which is nontoxic and is not subject to spontaneous combustion, led to the safety match, with its separation of the combustion ingredients between the match head and the special striking surface. J.E. Lundström of Sweden patented this method in 1855.

      Although safety matches became widely accepted, white phosphorus matches continued to be popular because of their keeping qualities and resistance to climatic conditions. However, at the end of the 19th century serious toxic effects of white phosphorus (“phossy jaw”) were discovered in the factory workers who made such matches. Phosphorus sesquisulfide, much less toxic, was first prepared by the French chemist Georges Lemoine in 1864 but was not used in matches until E.-D. Cahen and H. Sevène of the French government match monopoly filed a patent in 1898; within a few years white phosphorus was outlawed nearly everywhere.

      Modern safety matches usually have antimony sulfide, oxidizing agents such as potassium chlorate, and sulfur or charcoal in the heads, and red phosphorus in the striking surface. Nonsafety matches usually have phosphorus sesquisulfide in the heads.

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Universalium. 2010.

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  • Match — Match, n. [OE. macche, AS. gem[ae]cca; akin to gemaca, and to OS. gimako, OHG. gimah fitting, suitable, convenient, Icel. mark suitable, maki mate, Sw. make, Dan. mage; all from the root of E. make, v. See {Make} mate, and {Make}, v., and cf.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Match — (von altenglisch: maccun = „machen“: so viel wie: „Wettkampf“; auch: „Streichholz“) steht für: Satz (Sport), den Abschnitt eines Spiels Das Match, eine österreichische Fernsehshow Der Match, eine Schweizer Fernseh Dokusoap Miss Match, eine US… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Match — Match, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Matched}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Matching}.] 1. To be a mate or match for; to be able to complete with; to rival successfully; to equal. [1913 Webster] No settled senses of the world can match The pleasure of that madness.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Match — [mɛtʃ̮], das; [e]s, s: sportlicher Wettkampf in Form eines Spiels: ein spannendes Match; die Tennisspieler lieferten sich ein hartes Match. Syn.: ↑ Partie. Zus.: Tennismatch, Tischtennismatch. * * * Match 〈[ mæ̣tʃ] n.15 od. 11 oder m. 1 oder… …   Universal-Lexikon

  • match — match1 [mach] n. [ME macche < OFr mesche, wick of a candle, match < VL * micca, prob. altered (by assoc. with muccare, to snuff a candle, orig., to blow one s nose < L mucus, MUCUS) < L myxa < Gr, lamp wick, lit., nasal discharge,… …   English World dictionary

  • Match — Sn erw. fach. (20. Jh.) Entlehnung. Entlehnt aus ne. match, einer Substantivierung von ne. match abgleichen, vereinigen, gleich stark sein , zu ne. match Teil eines Paares, Gleichartiges , aus ae. gemæcca m./f. Gemahl(in), Teil eines Paares,… …   Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen sprache

  • Match — (m[a^]ch), n. [OE. macche, F. m[ e]che, F. m[ e]che, fr. L. myxa a lamp nozzle, Gr. my xa mucus, nostril, a lamp nozzle. Cf. {Mucus}.] Anything used for catching and retaining or communicating fire, made of some substance which takes fire readily …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Match — Match, v. i. 1. To be united in marriage; to mate. [1913 Webster] I hold it a sin to match in my kindred. Shak. [1913 Webster] Let tigers match with hinds, and wolves with sheep. Dryden. [1913 Webster] 2. To be of equal, or similar, size, figure …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • match — s.m.inv. ES ingl. {{wmetafile0}} TS sport 1. gara, incontro, partita: un match molto combattuto, aggiudicarsi, perdere il match, il match si è concluso alla terza ripresa per knock out tecnico Sinonimi: 1incontro, 1partita. 2. nell ippica, corsa… …   Dizionario italiano

  • match — vb Match, rival, equal, approach, touch are comparable, especially in negative constructions, when they mean to come up to or nearly up to the level or standard of something else. One thing matches another when it proves to be its mate, rather… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

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