Cromwellian chair


Cromwellian chair
Eng. Furniture.
an upright oaken chair, often with arms, having all pieces turned and a seat and back panel of leather or cloth attached with brass-headed nails.
[1900-05]

* * *

 sturdy, squarish chair with a leather back and seat, studded with brass-headed nails, made in England and in urban centres of colonial America in the mid-17th century. They were popular during the Puritan period and were named after Oliver Cromwell (Cromwell, Oliver). Because luxury and almost any kind of ornament were shunned in the prevailing climate of austerity, the only decoration was the pattern of bright nail heads and bobbin turning, a series of small bulbs, or bobbins, applied particularly to legs and stretchers. Such chairs were modified versions of the more comfortable farthingale chair, a design popular in the late 16th century.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • cromwellian chair — noun Usage: usually capitalized 1st C : a square low backed chair of simple design having turned legs and usually covered with leather fastened by metal nails * * * Eng. Furniture. an upright oaken chair, often with arms, having all pieces turned …   Useful english dictionary

  • Early American furniture — Furniture made in the second half of the 17th century by American colonists. The earliest pieces were massive and based on English Jacobean styles. Decoration consisted of carved flower motifs or lunettes and carved scrolls and leaves, sometimes… …   Universalium

  • Oliver Cromwell — Cromwell redirects here. For other uses, see Cromwell (disambiguation). For other people named Oliver Cromwell, see Oliver Cromwell (disambiguation). Oliver Cromwell Portrait of Oliver Cromwell by Samuel Cooper …   Wikipedia

  • Charles I of England — Charles I Portrait by Anthony van Dyck, 1636 King of England and Ireland (more...) Reign 27 March 1625 – 3 …   Wikipedia

  • Peter Talbot —     Peter Talbot     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► Peter Talbot     Archbishop of Dublin, 1669 1680; b. at Malahide, Dublin, in 1620. At an early age he entered the Society of Jesus in Portugal, where he pursued his sacred studies with great… …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Tuam — Tuaim   Town   High Street, looking east …   Wikipedia

  • Ceremonial mace — The ceremonial mace is a highly ornamented staff of metal or wood, carried before a sovereign or other high official in civic ceremonies by a mace bearer, intended to represent the official s authority. The mace, as used today, derives from the… …   Wikipedia

  • Restoration style — [ Belton House, an example of Carolean architecture.] Restoration style, also known as Carolean style (from the Latin Carolus (Charles), refers to the decorative arts popular in England from the restoration of the monarchy in 1660 to the late… …   Wikipedia

  • History of wood carving — From the remotest ages the decoration of wood has been a foremost art. The tendency of human nature has always been to ornament every article in use. The North American Indian carves his wooden fish hook or his pipe stem just as the Polynesian… …   Wikipedia

  • History of economic thought — The history of economic thought deals with different thinkers and theories in the field of political economy and economics from the ancient world to the present day. British philosopher Adam Smith is cited by many as the father of modern… …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.