cope


cope
cope1
copeless, adj.copelessness, n.
/kohp/, v., coped, coping.
v.i.
1. to struggle or deal, esp. on fairly even terms or with some degree of success (usually fol. by with): I will try to cope with his rudeness.
2. to face and deal with responsibilities, problems, or difficulties, esp. successfully or in a calm or adequate manner: After his breakdown he couldn't cope any longer.
3. Archaic. to come into contact; meet (usually fol. by with).
v.t.
4. Brit. Informal. to cope with.
5. Obs. to come into contact with; encounter.
[1300-50; ME coupen < AF, OF couper to strike, deriv. of coup COUP1]
Syn. 1. wrestle, strive, persevere.
cope2
/kohp/, n., v., coped, coping.
n.
1. a long mantle, esp. of silk, worn by ecclesiastics over the alb or surplice in processions and on other occasions.
2. any cloaklike or canopylike covering.
3. the sky.
4. a coping.
5. Metall. the upper half of a flask. Cf. drag (def. 32).
v.t.
6. to furnish with or as if with a cope or coping.
[1175-1225; ME < ML capa, var. of cappa CAP1]
cope3
/kohp/, v.t., coped, coping.
1. Building Trades.
a. to join (two molded wooden members) by undercutting the end of one of them to the profile of the other so that the joint produced resembles a miter joint (usually fol. by in or together).
b. to form (a joint between such members) in this way.
c. to undercut the end of (a molded wooden member) in order to form a coped joint.
d. to cut away (a flange of a metal member) so that it may be joined to another member at an angle.
2. Falconry. to clip or dull (the beak or talons of a hawk).
[1565-75; < F couper to cut; see COPE1]
cope4
/kohp/, v.t., coped, coping. Brit.
to barter; trade; exchange.
[1400-50; late ME copen < LG; cf. MD côpen to buy]

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▪ ecclesiastical vestment
 liturgical vestment worn by Roman Catholic and some Anglican clergy at non-eucharistic functions. A full-length cloak formed from a semicircular piece of cloth, it is open at the front and is fastened at the breast by hooks or a brooch. It is made of silk or other rich material in various colours. Originally, a hood was attached to the neck, but this was replaced by a shield-shaped piece of material. In the 20th century the hood was restored. The cope was adapted from the cappa choralis (“choir mantle”), a black, hooded vestment worn by clergy in processions and choir services. It is known that the cope was in use by the end of the 8th century as a liturgical vestment, and by the end of the 11th century it was universally adopted.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • COPE — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda COPE Área de radiodifusión  España Eslogan Somos libres Primera emisión 1960 Formato FM …   Wikipedia Español

  • Cope — ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Arthur C. Cope (1909–1966), US amerikanischer Chemiker Edward Drinker Cope (1840–1897), US amerikanischer Biologe Elizabeth Frances Cope (1902–1982), US amerikanische Mathematikerin Frank Cope (1910–1990) …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Cope — • A vestment which may most conveniently be described as a long liturgical mantle, open in front and fastened at the breast with a band or clasp Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Cope     Cope …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Cope — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Cope puede significar: La Red COPE Cope, la parte superior de un molde Cope pedanía del municipio de Águilas (Murcia) España. Botánicos y sus abreviaturas científicas E.A.Cope Edward A. Cope fl. 1991 Cope Thomas… …   Wikipedia Español

  • COPE — may refer to:*The Council of Pacific Education (COPE), a regional branch of Education International (EI IE), the global federation of teachers trade unions. *Coalition of Progressive Electors, a municipal political party in Vancouver, BC, Canada… …   Wikipedia

  • COPE (E. D.) — COPE EDWARD DRINKER (1840 1897) Paléontologiste américain. Après avoir enseigné à Haverford College de 1864 à 1867, Edward Cope consacre plus de vingt années de sa vie à des expéditions scientifiques dans l’Amérique du Nord et l’Amérique… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • cope — [ koup ] verb intransitive *** to deal successfully with a difficult situation or job: There are refugees arriving all the time and we are doing our best to cope. Considering her injuries, she s coping remarkably well. cope with: a seminar on… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • cope — cope; cope·man; cope·mate; cope·stone; glau·cope; …   English syllables

  • Cope — Cope, v. t. 1. To bargain for; to buy. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] 2. To make return for; to requite; to repay. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] three thousand ducats due unto the Jew, We freely cope your courteous pains withal. Shak. [1913 Webster] 3. To match… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Cope — Cope, v. i. To form a cope or arch; to bend or arch; to bow. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Some bending down and coping toward the earth. Holland. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Cope — Cope, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Coped} (k[=o]pt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Coping}.] [OE. copen, coupen, to buy, bargain, prob. from D. koopen to buy, orig., to bargain. See {Cheap}.] 1. To exchange or barter. [Obs.] Spenser. [1913 Webster] 2. To encounter;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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