conquest


conquest
/kon"kwest, kong"-/, n.
1. the act or state of conquering or the state of being conquered; vanquishment.
2. the winning of favor, affection, love, etc.: the conquest of Antony by Cleopatra.
3. a person whose favor, affection, etc., has been won: He's another one of her conquests.
4. anything acquired by conquering, as a nation, a territory, or spoils.
[1275-1325; ME conqueste < AF, OF < VL *conquesta (for L conquisita, fem. ptp. of conquirere). See CON-, QUEST]
Syn. 1. subjugation, defeat, mastery. See victory. 2. seduction, enchantment.
Ant. 1. surrender.

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      in international law, the acquisition of territory through force, especially by a victorious state in a war at the expense of a defeated state. An effective conquest takes place when physical appropriation of territory ( annexation) is followed by “subjugation” (i.e., the legal process of transferring title).

      Conquest is associated with the traditional principle that sovereign states may resort to war at their discretion and that territorial and other gains achieved by military victory will be recognized as legally valid. The doctrine of conquest and its derivative rules were challenged in the 20th century by the development of the principle that aggressive war is contrary to international law, a view that is expressed in the covenant of the League of Nations (Nations, League of), the Kellogg-Briand Pact of 1928, the charters and judgments of the international military tribunals created at the end of World War II to try those accused of war crimes (war crime), the Charter of the United Nations, and numerous other multipartite treaties, declarations, and resolutions. The logical corollary to the outlawry of aggressive war is the denial of legal recognition to the fruits of such war. This implication was contained in what became known as the Stimson Doctrine, enunciated in January 1932 by U.S. Secretary of State Henry L. Stimson (Stimson, Henry L) and subsequently affirmed by the assembly of the League of Nations and by several conferences of the American republics. The Draft Declaration on Rights and Duties of States, formulated in 1949 by the International Law Commission of the UN, contained (in Article XI) the rule that states are obligated not to recognize territorial acquisitions achieved by aggressive war.

      Although conquest has been outlawed, states sometimes ignore this principle in practice. In 1975, for example, Indonesia invaded and annexed the former Portuguese colony of East Timor, and in 1990 the Iraqi government of Saddam Hussein (Ṣaddām Ḥussein) invaded and attempted to annex Kuwait. In the latter case, the response of the UN Security Council, which endorsed military force to remove Iraq's troops from Kuwait, reinforced the unacceptability of conquest. In general, conquest is not as significant an issue in international politics as it once was, because territorial expansion is no longer a common ambition among states.

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Universalium. 2010.

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