condition


condition
conditionable, adj.
/keuhn dish"euhn/, n.
1. a particular mode of being of a person or thing; existing state; situation with respect to circumstances.
2. state of health: He was reported to be in critical condition.
3. fit or requisite state: to be out of condition; to be in no condition to run.
4. social position: in a lowly condition.
5. a restricting, limiting, or modifying circumstance: It can happen only under certain conditions.
6. a circumstance indispensable to some result; prerequisite; that on which something else is contingent: conditions of acceptance.
7. Usually, conditions. existing circumstances: poor living conditions.
8. something demanded as an essential part of an agreement; provision; stipulation: He accepted on one condition.
9. Law.
a. a stipulation in an agreement or instrument transferring property that provides for a change consequent on the occurrence or nonoccurrence of a stated event.
b. the event upon which this stipulation depends.
10. Informal. an abnormal or diseased state of part of the body: heart condition; skin condition.
11. U.S. Educ.
a. a requirement imposed on a college student who fails to reach the prescribed standard in a course at the end of the regular period of instruction, permitting credit to be established by later performance.
b. the course or subject to which the requirement is attached.
12. Gram. protasis.
13. Logic. the antecedent of a conditional proposition.
14. on or upon condition that, with the promise or provision that; provided that; if: She accepted the position on condition that there would be opportunity for advancement.
v.t.
15. to put in a fit or proper state.
16. to accustom or inure: to condition oneself to the cold.
17. to air-condition.
18. to form or be a condition of; determine, limit, or restrict as a condition.
19. to subject to particular conditions or circumstances: Her studies conditioned her for her job.
20. U.S. Educ. to impose a condition on (a student).
21. to test (a commodity) to ascertain its condition.
22. to make (something) a condition; stipulate.
23. Psychol. to establish a conditioned response in (a subject).
24. Textiles.
a. to test (fibers or fabrics) for the presence of moisture or other foreign matter.
b. to replace moisture lost from (fibers or fabrics) in manipulation or manufacture.
v.i.
25. to make conditions.
[1275-1325; ME condicioun < AF; OF < L condicion- (s. of condicio) agreement, equiv. to con- CON- + dic- say (see DICTATE) + -ion- -ION; sp. with t by influence of LL or ML forms; cf. F condition]
Syn. 1. See state. 8. requirement, proviso.

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logic
      in logic, a stipulation, or provision, that needs to be satisfied; also, something that must exist or be the case or happen in order for something else to do so (as in “the will to live is a condition for survival”).

      In logic, a sentence or proposition of the form “If A then B” [in symbols, AB] is called a conditional (sentence or proposition). Similarly, “Whenever A then B” {in symbols, (x) [A(x) ⊃ B(x)]} may be called a general conditional. In such uses, “conditional” is a synonym for “hypothetical” and is opposed to “categorical.” Closely related in meaning are the common and useful expressions “sufficient condition” and “necessary condition.” If some instance of a property P is always accompanied by a corresponding instance of some other property Q, but not necessarily vice versa, then P is said to be a sufficient condition for Q and, equivalently, Q is said to be a necessary condition for P. Thus, a severed spinal column is a sufficient, but not a necessary, condition for death; while lack of consciousness is a necessary, but not a sufficient, condition for death. In any case in which P is both a necessary and a sufficient condition for Q, the latter is also a necessary and sufficient condition for the former, each being regularly accompanied by the other. The terminology is also applicable to logical or mathematical or other nontemporal properties; thus, it is proper to speak of “a necessary condition for the solution of an equation” or “a sufficient condition for the validity of a syllogism.” See also implication.

      In metaphysics, the above uses of the term condition have led to the contrast between “conditioned” and “absolute” being (or “dependent” versus “independent” being). Thus, all finite things exist in certain relations not only to all other things but possibly also to thought; i.e., all finite existence is “conditioned.” Hence, Sir William Hamilton, a 19th-century Scottish philosopher, spoke of the “philosophy of the unconditioned”; i.e., of thought in distinction to things that are determined by thought in relation to other things. An analogous distinction was made by H.W.B. Joseph, an Oxford logician, between the universal laws of nature and conditional principles, which, though regarded as having the force of law, are yet dependent or derivative; i.e., cannot be treated as universal truths. Such principles hold good under present conditions but may be invalid under others; they hold good only as corollaries from the laws of nature as they operate under existing conditions.

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Universalium. 2010.

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  • condition — [ kɔ̃disjɔ̃ ] n. f. • v. 1160 « convention, pacte »; bas lat. conditio, class. condicio I ♦ (État, manière d être.) A ♦ (Personnes) 1 ♦ (XIIIe) Vieilli Rang social, place dans la société. ⇒ classe, état. L inégalité des conditions sociales. Les… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • condition — con·di·tion 1 n 1: an uncertain future act or event whose occurrence or nonoccurrence determines the rights or obligations of a party under a legal instrument and esp. a contract; also: a clause in the instrument describing the act or event and… …   Law dictionary

  • condition — CONDITION. s. f. La nature, l estat & la qualité d une chose ou d une personne. La condition des choses d icy bas. la condition des hommes semble plus malheureuse que celle des animaux. la condition des Princes ne souffre pas &c. cette… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • condition — CONDITION. s. f. La nature, l état et la qualité d une chose ou d une personne. La condition des choses humaines est d être périssables. La condition des Princes les oblige à plus de devoirs que les autres hommes. Cette marchandise n a pas les… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie Française 1798

  • Condition — • That which is necessary or at least conducive to the actual operation of a cause Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Condition     Condition      …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • condition — con‧di‧tion [kənˈdɪʆn] noun [countable] LAW INSURANCE something stated in a contract, agreement, or insurance policy that must be done or must be true otherwise the contract, agreement, or policy will be ended or will not remain in force: • You… …   Financial and business terms

  • condition — Condition, Conditio. Basse condition, Ignobilitas. Un homme de basse condition ou estat, Vnus de multis, Infimus homo, Homo vltimae professionis. Quand on est issu de parens de basse condition, Obscuritas. Qui n est point de servile condition,… …   Thresor de la langue françoyse

  • Condition — Con*di tion, n. [F., fr. L. conditio (better condicio) agreement, compact, condition; con + a root signifying to show, point out, akin to dicere to say, dicare to proclaim, dedicate. See {Teach}, {Token}.] 1. Mode or state of being; state or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • condition — [kən dish′ən] n. [ME & OFr condicion < L condicio, agreement, situation < condicere, to speak with, agree < com , together + dicere, to speak: see DICTION] 1. anything called for as a requirement before the performance or completion of… …   English World dictionary

  • condition — n 1 Condition, stipulation, terms, provision, proviso, reservation, strings are comparable when meaning something that is established or is regarded as the prerequisite of a promise or agreement being fulfilled or taking effect. Condition implies …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Condition — or Conditions may refer to: Contents 1 Logic 2 Computer programming 3 Other 4 See also Logic Logical conditional …   Wikipedia


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