commonwealth


commonwealth
/kom"euhn welth'/, n.
1. (cap.) a group of sovereign states and their dependencies associated by their own choice and linked with common objectives and interests: the British Commonwealth.
3. (cap.) a federation of states: the Commonwealth of Australia.
4. (cap.) a self-governing territory associated with the U.S.: official designation of Puerto Rico.
5. (cap.) Eng. Hist. the English government from the abolition of the monarchy in 1649 until the establishment of the Protectorate in 1653, sometimes extended to include the restoration of Charles II in 1660.
6. (cap.) the official designation (rather than "State") of four states of the U.S.: Kentucky, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and Virginia.
7. any group of persons united by some common interest.
8. the whole body of people of a nation or state; the body politic.
9. a state in which the supreme power is held by the people; a republican or democratic state.
10. Obs. the public welfare.
[1375-1425; late ME commun welthe]

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Free association of sovereign states consisting of Britain and many of its former dependencies who have chosen to maintain ties of friendship and cooperation.

It was established in 1931 by the Statute of Westminster as the British Commonwealth of Nations. Later its name was changed and it was redefined to include independent nations. Most of the dependent states that gained independence after 1947 chose Commonwealth membership. The British monarch serves as its symbolic head, and meetings of the more than 50 Commonwealth heads of government take place every two years. See also British empire.

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▪ association of states
also called  Commonwealth of Nations , formerly (1931–49)  British Commonwealth of Nations 

       Members of the Commonwealth Members of the Commonwealtha free association of sovereign states comprising the United Kingdom and a number of its former dependencies who have chosen to maintain ties of friendship and practical cooperation and who acknowledge the British monarch as symbolic head of their association. In 1965 the Commonwealth Secretariat was established in London to organize and coordinate Commonwealth activities.

      Historically, the Commonwealth was an evolutionary outgrowth of the British Empire. The traditional British policy of allowing considerable self-government in its colonies led to the existence by the 19th century of several dependent states that were populated to a significant degree by Europeans accustomed to forms of parliamentary rule and that possessed large measures of sovereignty. By 1931 they were recognized as having special status within the empire by the Statute of Westminster (Westminster, Statute of), which referred specifically to a “British Commonwealth of Nations.” The rapid growth of nationalism in other parts of the empire from the 1920s produced a long series of grants of independence, beginning with that to India in 1947, and required a redefinition of the Commonwealth. In 1947 India and Pakistan became members of the Commonwealth, the first with chiefly non-European populations. In 1948 Burma (Myanmar) became independent and rejected membership. In 1949 India announced its intention to become a republic, which would have required its withdrawal from the Commonwealth under the existing rules, but at a meeting of Commonwealth heads of government in London in April 1949 it was agreed that India could continue its membership if it accepted the British crown as only “the symbol of the free association” of Commonwealth members. That declaration was the first to drop the adjective British, and thereafter the official name of the organization became the Commonwealth of Nations, or simply the Commonwealth. The Commonwealth was also beset by other difficulties, some members opting to withdraw from the organization, as did Ireland (1949), South Africa (1961), and Pakistan (1972), though both South Africa and Pakistan eventually rejoined (the former in 1994 and the latter in 1989). Commonwealth membership grew dramatically in the second half of the 20th century as former dependencies attained sovereignty. Most of the dependent states granted independence chose Commonwealth membership, and the organization has even grown to include Mozambique (joined 1995), which was the first country granted entry that was never part of the British Empire or under the control of any member.

      The Commonwealth differs from other international bodies. It has no formal constitution or bylaws. The members have no legal or formal obligation to one another; they are held together by shared traditions, institutions, and experiences as well as by economic self-interest. Commonwealth action is based upon consultation between members, which is conducted through correspondence and through conversations in meetings. Each member country sends an emissary, called a high commissioner, to the capitals of the other members. A Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting is held every two years. At the meeting in Singapore in 1971, members adopted a declaration that restated the Commonwealth's voluntary and cooperative nature and committed the organization to promoting international peace, fighting racism, opposing colonial domination, and reducing inequities in wealth. This declaration was echoed at the meeting in Harare, Zimbabwe, in 1991, when leaders further committed the organization to human rights and democracy.

      Britain has huge overseas investments, both government and private, in the Commonwealth. When Britain joined the European Economic Community (later called the European Community) in 1973, the trade privileges of member countries began to be reduced. Now Commonwealth members have trade agreements with the European Union. Many of the exports of Commonwealth countries go to other member countries. In 1996 the Commonwealth Africa Investment Fund was established to increase investment in that continent. There are also significant educational links between members, as many British teachers travel overseas and many students from Commonwealth members study in Britain. Other cultural links include the Commonwealth Games, a sporting competition held every four years.

      In addition to independent members, the Commonwealth also comprises dependent territories, which are formally governed by Great Britain, Australia, or New Zealand. Most of the older dependencies are colonies. Dependencies include Anguilla, Bermuda, the Cayman Islands, the Falkland Islands, Gibraltar, and the Turks and Caicos Islands (Britain); Christmas Island, the Cocos Islands, the Coral Sea Islands, and Norfolk Island (Australia); and Niue and Tokelau (New Zealand). Britain has followed a policy of leading the dependencies toward self-government by creating territorial governments in them; these governments comprise a lawmaking body (often called the legislative council); an executive body (called the executive council), which with the governor is the executive authority; and an independent judiciary. At first government posts are appointive, but an increasing elected element is introduced, as constitutions are altered, until elected officials are made wholly responsible for local affairs. After a colony achieves internal self-government, its legislature may apply to the British Parliament for complete independence. It then decides whether to remain in the Commonwealth.

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Commonwealth — of Nations « Commonwealth » redirige ici. Pour les autres significations, voir Commonwealth (homonymie) …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Commonwealth — Com‧mon‧wealth [ˈkɒmənwelθ ǁ ˈkɑː ] also ˌCommonwealth of ˈNations noun ORGANIZATIONS an organization of about 50 countries that were once part of the British empire, and that are now connected politically and economically: • Britain s gradual… …   Financial and business terms

  • commonwealth — [käm′ənwelth΄] n. [ME commun welthe: see COMMON & WEALTH] 1. the people of a nation or state; body politic 2. a) a nation or state in which there is self government; democracy or republic b) a federation of states [the Commonwealth of Australia ] …   English World dictionary

  • commonwealth — com·mon·wealth / kä mən ˌwelth/ n 1: a nation, state, or other political unit: as a: one founded on law and united by compact or tacit agreement by the people for the common good b: one in which supreme authority is vested in the people c …   Law dictionary

  • commonwealth — ► NOUN 1) an independent state or community, especially a democratic republic. 2) (the Commonwealth or in full the Commonwealth of Nations) an association consisting of the UK together with states that were previously part of the British Empire,… …   English terms dictionary

  • commonwealth — /comănwéls/ s. n. grup de state. (<engl. commonwealth) Trimis de raduborza, 09.09.2006. Sursa: MDN  COMMONWEALTH COMĂNUÉLS/ s. n. grup de state. (< engl. commonwealth) Trimis de raduborza, 15.09.2007. Sursa: MDN …   Dicționar Român

  • commonwealth — [kɔmɔnwɛls] n. m. ÉTYM. 1948, Larousse; mot angl., « communauté », abrév. de Commonwealth of Nations. ❖ ♦ Ensemble des États et territoires émancipés de l ancien Empire britannique, liés entre eux par le seul serment d allégeance à la Couronne… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Commonwealth — Com mon*wealth (?; 277), n. [Common + wealth well being.] 1. A state; a body politic consisting of a certain number of men, united, by compact or tacit agreement, under one form of government and system of laws. [1913 Webster] The trappings of a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Commonwealth — (izg. kȍmonvelt) m DEFINICIJA pol. naziv za zajednicu zemalja koje sačinjavaju Britansko Kraljevstvo ETIMOLOGIJA engl. The Commonwealth of Nations …   Hrvatski jezični portal

  • commonwealth — late 15c., public welfare, general good, from COMMON (Cf. common) (adj.) + WEALTH (Cf. wealth); meaning the state is attested from 1510s; applied specifically to the government of England in the period 1649 1660 …   Etymology dictionary

  • commonwealth — [n] political or geographic area body politic, citizenry, citizens, commonality, democracy, federation, nation, people, polity, republic, society; concepts 301,512 …   New thesaurus


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