colonnade

colonnade
colonnaded, adj.
/kol'euh nayd"/, n.
1. Archit. a series of regularly spaced columns supporting an entablature and usually one side of a roof. Cf. arcade.
2. a series of trees planted in a long row, as on each side of a driveway or road.
[1710-20; < F, equiv. to colonne COLUMN + -ade -ADE1, on the model of It colonnato]

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Row of columns generally supporting an entablature, used either as an independent feature (e.g., a covered walkway) or as part of a building (e.g., a portico).

The earliest colonnades appear in the temple architecture of ancient Greece. In a basilica, colonnades are used to separate the side aisles from the central space. See also stoa.

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 row of columns generally supporting an entablature (row of horizontal moldings), used either as an independent feature (e.g., a covered walkway) or as part of a building (e.g., a porch or portico). The earliest colonnades appear in the temple architecture of antiquity, numerous examples of which survive in Greece and Rome.

      The Greek market hall, or stoa, as seen in Athens, is a particularly good illustration of a long colonnade serving a commercial purpose. Colonnades were much employed in the Baroque and Neoclassical periods, notably in St. Peter's (Saint Peter's Basilica) in Rome, which was designed by Gian Lorenzo Bernini (Bernini, Gian Lorenzo) and completed in 1667.

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Universalium. 2010.


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