cinder cone


cinder cone
a small, conical volcano built of ash and cinders.
[1840-50]

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or ash cone

Deposit around a volcanic vent, formed by rock fragments or cinders that accumulate and gradually build a conical hill with a bowl-shaped crater at the top.

Cinder cones develop from explosive eruptions of lavas and are often found along the flanks of shield (gently sloping) volcanoes. Lava flows may break out of the cone, or they may flow from under the cone through tunnels. Cinder cones are common in nearly all volcanic areas. Although they are composed of loose or only moderately consolidated cinder, many are surprisingly long-lasting, because rain falling on them sinks into the highly permeable cinders instead of running off down their slopes and eroding them.

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also called  ash cone 
 deposit around a volcanic vent, formed by pyroclastic rock fragments (formed by volcanic or igneous action), or cinders, which accumulate and gradually build a conical hill with a bowl-shaped crater at the top. Cinder cones develop from explosive eruptions of mafic (mafic rock) (heavy, dark ferromagnesian) and intermediate lavas and are often found along the flanks of shield volcanoes. The outside of the cone is often inclined at about 30°, the angle of repose (the slope at which the loose cinder can stand in equilibrium). Cinder cones may be only a few tens of feet high, or they may grow to a height of several hundred metres (several thousand feet), like that of Paricutín in Mexico. Lava flows may break out of or breach the cone, or they may flow from under the cone through tunnels. Cinder cones are numerous in nearly all volcanic districts. Although they are composed of loose or only moderately consolidated cinder, many of them are surprisingly enduring features of the landscape because rain falling on them sinks into the highly permeable cinder instead of running off down their slopes to erode them.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

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