chromium


chromium
/kroh"mee euhm/, n.
1. a lustrous, hard, brittle, metallic element used in alloy steels for hardness and corrosion resistance, as in stainless steel, and for plating other metals: chromium salts are used as pigments and mordants. Symbol: Cr; at. wt.: 51.996; at. no.: 24; sp. gr.: 7.1.
2. chrome (def. 2).
[1800-10; CHROME + -IUM]

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Metallic chemical element, one of the transition elements, chemical symbol Cr, atomic number 24.

A hard, steel-gray metal that takes a high polish, it is used in alloys (e.g., ferrochromium, steel, stainless steel) to increase strength and corrosion resistance. It usually has valence 2, 3, or 6 and always occurs combined with other elements, especially oxygen; chromite is its only commercial source. Various coloured gemstones (e.g., ruby, emerald, serpentine) owe their colour to chromium. Sodium chromate and dichromate are used in leather tanning, in metal surface treatment, and as catalysts. Chromium trioxide is used in chrome plating and as a colorant for ceramics. Chromium oxide, lead chromate, and various other chromium compounds are used as pigments. Chromium dioxide, strongly magnetic, is used in recording tapes and as a catalyst.

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Introduction
 chemical element of Group 6 (VIb) of the periodic table, a hard, steel-gray metal that takes a high polish and is used in alloys to increase strength and corrosion resistance. Chromium was discovered (1797) by the French chemist Nicolas-Louis Vauquelin (Vauquelin, Nicolas-Louis) and isolated as the metal a year later; it was named for its multicoloured compounds. The green colour of emerald, serpentine, and chrome mica and the red colour of ruby are due to small amounts of chromium. The name of the element chromium (from Greek chrōmos, “colour”) connotes the pronounced and varied colorations of chromium compounds.

Occurrence, uses, and properties
      Chromium is a relatively abundant element in the Earth's crust; the free metal is never found in nature. Most ores consist of the mineral chromite, the ideal formula of which is FeCr2O4. It is widely dispersed in natural deposits, which are usually contaminated with oxygen, magnesium, aluminum, and silica; their chromium content varies from 42 to 56 percent. One of the chief uses of chromium is in ferrous alloys, for which the pure metal is not required. Accordingly, chromite is often reduced with carbon in a furnace, producing the alloy ferrochromium, which contains iron and chromium in an atom ratio of approximately 1 to 2.

      To obtain pure chromium, chromite is first treated with molten alkali and oxygen, converting all of the chromium to the alkali chromate, and the latter is dissolved in water and eventually precipitated as sodium dichromate, Na2Cr2O7. The dichromate is then reduced with carbon to chromium sesquioxide, Cr2O3, and that oxide in turn is reduced with aluminum to give the chromium metal.

      Chromium is added to iron and nickel in the form of ferrochromium to produce alloys specially characterized by their high resistance to corrosion and oxidation. Used in small amounts, chromium hardens steel. Stainless steels are alloys of chromium and iron in which the chromium content varies from 10 to 26 percent. Chromium alloys are used to fabricate such products as oil tubing, automobile trim, and cutlery. Chromite is used as a refractory and as a raw material for the production of chromium chemicals.

      The metal is white, hard, lustrous, and brittle and is extremely resistant to ordinary corrosive reagents; this resistance accounts for its extensive use as an electroplated protective coating. At elevated temperatures chromium unites directly with the halogens or with sulfur, silicon, boron, nitrogen, carbon, or oxygen. (For additional treatment of chromium metal and its production, see chromium processing.)

      Natural chromium consists of a mixture of four stable isotopes: chromium-52 (83.76 percent), chromium-53 (9.55 percent), chromium-50 (4.31 percent), and chromium-54 (2.38 percent). The metal is paramagnetic (weakly attracted to a magnet). It exists in two forms: body-centred cubic (alpha) and hexagonal close-packed (beta). At room temperature, chromium slowly dissolves in hydrochloric and dilute sulfuric acids. Certain oxidizing agents produce a thin unreactive oxide layer on the metal, rendering it passive also to dilute mineral acids, such as sulfuric, nitric, or cold aqua regia. At ordinary temperatures the metal shows no reaction to seawater or to wet or dry air.

Principal compounds
      The most common oxidation states of chromium are +6, +3, and +2. A few stable compounds of the +5, +4, and +1 states, however, are known.

      In the +6 oxidation state, the most important species formed by chromium are the chromate (chromate mineral), CrO42-, and dichromate, Cr2O72-, ions. These ions form the basis for a series of industrially important salts. Among them are sodium chromate, Na2CrO4, and sodium dichromate, Na2Cr2O7, which are used in leather tanning, in metal surface treatment, and as catalysts in various industrial processes.

      Chromium forms several commercially valuable oxygen compounds, the most important of which is chromium oxide, commonly called chromium trioxide or chromic acid, CrO3, in which chromium is in the +6 oxidation state. An orange-red crystalline solid, chromic acid liquefies gradually when exposed to moist air. It is usually produced by treatment of sodium dichromate with sulfuric acid. Chromic acid is used chiefly for chromium plating but is also employed as a colorant in ceramics. It is a powerful oxidant and may react violently with some organic materials, but such solutions are often utilized by controlled oxidations in organic synthesis.

      Another significant oxygen compound is chromium oxide, also known as chromium sesquioxide or chromic oxide, Cr2O3, in which chromium is in the +3 oxidation state. It is prepared by calcining sodium dichromate in the presence of carbon or sulfur. Chromium oxide is a green powder and is employed extensively as a pigment; its hydrate form, known as Guignet's green, is used when chemical and heat resistance are required.

atomic number
24
atomic weight
51.996
melting point
1,890° C (3,434° F)
boiling point
2,482° C (4,500° F)
specific gravity
7.20 (28° C)
oxidation states
+2, +3, +6
electronic config.
[Ar]3d54s1

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Universalium. 2010.

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