chiropractic


chiropractic
/kuy'reuh prak"tik/, n.
1. a therapeutic system based primarily upon the interactions of the spine and nervous system, the method of treatment usually being to adjust the segments of the spinal column.
2. a chiropractor.
[1895-1900, Amer.; CHIRO- + -practic < Gk praktikós; see PRACTICAL]

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System of healing based on the theory that disease results from lack of normal nerve function, often caused by displaced vertebrae putting pressure on nerve roots.

Treatment involves manipulations of body structures, primarily the spinal column, and use of other techniques when necessary. It concerns the relationship between musculoskeletal structures and functions of the body and the nervous system. The chiropractic method was propounded in 1895 by Daniel David Palmer (1845–1913). Practitioners are trained at accredited chiropractic colleges.

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      a system of healing based on the theory that disease in the human body results from a lack of normal nerve function. Chiropractors employ treatment by manipulation and specific adjustment of body structures, such as the spinal column (vertebral column), and use physical therapy when necessary. Chiropractors thus are concerned with the relationship between the musculoskeletal structures and functions of the body and the nervous system in the restoration and maintenance of health. The chiropractic method was founded in 1895 by an Iowa merchant, D.D. Palmer, who reportedly cured deafness in one individual by realigning a misaligned vertebrae. Doctors of chiropractic are trained in and through accredited chiropractic colleges. Procedures include the adjustment and manipulation of the articulations and adjacent tissues of the human body, particularly of the spinal column, and sometimes related therapies such as heat therapy, traction, and nutrition counseling.

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Universalium. 2010.