Chain


Chain
/chayn/, n.
Sir Ernst Boris /errnst, ernst/, 1906-79, English biochemist, born in Germany: Nobel prize for medicine 1945.

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(as used in expressions)
chain silicate
Chain Sir Ernst Boris

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also called  Gunter's Chain,  

      in surveying, a unit of length. See surveyor's chain.

▪ connecting device
      series of links, usually of metal, joined together to form a flexible connector for various purposes, such as holding, pulling, hoisting, hauling, conveying, and transmitting power.

 The simplest and oldest type of chain is the coil chain, which is made from straight metal bars that are bent to an oval shape, looped together, and welded shut. These bars were traditionally made of wrought iron, but chains made of steel have gained favour in recent years. This type of chain was traditionally used in slings, cranes, and power shovels, but it has partly been replaced by cable or wire rope. On some hoists, coil chains run on special pulleys with recesses in which the chain fits. A variant of the coil chain is the stud-link chain, each of whose links has a bar or stud across its inside width. These studs add weight, keep the chain from fouling or kinking, and help prevent deformation; stud-link chains are preferred for use as anchor and cable chains on ships. (See Figure 1—>.)

  Chain drives are widely used for the transmission of power where shafts are separated at distances greater than that for which gears are practical. In such cases, sprockets take the place of gears but, being widely separated, drive one another by means of the chain passing over the sprocket teeth. (A sprocket is a wheel with teeth shaped to mesh with the chain; see Figure 2—>.) The chains used in conveyor belts are commonly block chains, which consist of solid or laminated blocks connected by side plates and pins. (See Figure 3—>.) The blocks engage with teeth on sprocket wheels. Depending on the material being moved, buckets, hooks, or other devices are connected to the blocks.

 A roller chain is a development of the block chain in which the block is replaced by two side plates, a pair of bushings, and rollers. (See Figure 3—>.) This type of chain is used on bicycles and is adaptable to many other needs, from small-strand drives for microfilm projectors to multiple-strand chains for heavy-duty service in oil-drilling equipment. Roller chains are assembled from pin links and roller links. A pin link consists of the two side plates connected by two tightly fitted pins. A roller link consists of two side plates connected by two tightly fitted bushings on which hardened steel rollers are free to rotate. When assembled, the pins are a free fit in the bushings and rotate slightly, relative to the bushings, when the chain goes onto and leaves a sprocket.

      A silent chain is essentially an assemblage of gear racks, each with two teeth, pivotally connected to form a closed chain. The links are pin-connected, flat steel plates with straight teeth. Silent chains are quieter than roller chains, can operate at higher speeds, and can transmit more load for the same width.

      Small, weldless chain types include knotted chain, stamped-link chain, bead chain, and jewelry chain; these find use in electric fixtures, key chains, jewelry, and other small articles. See also linkage.

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Chain — (ch[=a]n), n. [F. cha[^i]ne, fr. L. catena. Cf. {Catenate}.] 1. A series of links or rings, usually of metal, connected, or fitted into one another, used for various purposes, as of support, of restraint, of ornament, of the exertion and… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • chain — [tʆeɪn] noun [countable] 1. a number of shops, hotels, cinemas etc owned or managed by the same company or person: • Britain s leading supermarket chain chain of • a chain of travel agents. 2. a series of people or organizations involved in… …   Financial and business terms

  • chain — chain; chain·er; chain·less; chain·let; chain·man; chain·o·mat·ic; chain·wale; en·chain; en·chain·ment; un·chain; mul·ti·chain; …   English syllables

  • chain — [chān] n. [ME & OFr chaine < L catena < IE base * kat , to twist, twine > prob. OE heathor, confinement] 1. a flexible series of joined links, usually of metal, used to pull, confine, etc. or to transmit power 2. TIRE CHAIN 3. [pl.] a)… …   English World dictionary

  • Chain — Chain, v. t. [imp. p. p. {Chained} (ch[=a]nd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Chaining}.] 1. To fasten, bind, or connect with a chain; to fasten or bind securely, as with a chain; as, to chain a bulldog. [1913 Webster] Chained behind the hostile car. Prior.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • chain — I (nexus) noun act of coming together, act of coupling, act of joining, act of uniting, affiliation, affinity, alliance, association, attachment, attraction, bond, bond of union, bridge, conjunction, connectedness, connecting link, connecting… …   Law dictionary

  • CHAIN — can refer to:* CHAIN programming language * CHAIN (industry standard), an acronym for Ceced Home Appliances Interoperating Network, a standard for a multi brands home network of interactive household appliances.See also Chain …   Wikipedia

  • chain — [n1] succession, series alternation, catena, concatenation, conglomerate, consecution, continuity, group, order, progression, row, sequence, set, string, syndicate, train, trust; concepts 432,727,769 chain [n2] connected metal links; jewelry made …   New thesaurus

  • chain —   [tʃeɪn, englisch], noch gebräuchliche Längeneinheit in Großbritannien und den USA: 1 chain = 22 yd = 20,1168 m …   Universal-Lexikon

  • Chain — [tʃein] das; s, <aus engl. chain »Kette«, dies aus fr. chaîne, vgl. ↑Chaine> Längeneinheit in Großbritannien u. in den USA (20,11 m) …   Das große Fremdwörterbuch

  • chain n — chain store n, chain letter …   English expressions


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