Cepheid variable


Cepheid variable
a variable star in which changes in brightness are due to alternate contractions and expansions in volume.
[1900-05; CEPHE(US) + -ID1]

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One of a class of variable stars whose period of variation is closely related to its luminosity and is therefore useful in measuring the distances to clusters of stars and galaxies.

Named for the prototype of this class found in the constellation Cepheus, classical Cepheids have periods from about 1.5 days to over 50 days and are Population I stars (see Populations I and II). The longer the period of such a star, the greater its natural brightness; this relationship was discovered in 1912 by the American astronomer Henrietta Leavitt (b. 1868
d. 1921).

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 one of a class of variable stars whose periods (i.e., the time for one cycle) of variation are closely related to their luminosity and that are therefore useful in measuring interstellar and intergalactic distances. Most are spectral type F (moderately hot) at maximum luminosity and type G (cooler, Sun-like) at minimum. The prototype star is Delta Cephei, the variability of which was discovered by John Goodricke (Goodricke, John) in 1784. In 1912 Henrietta Leavitt (Leavitt, Henrietta Swan) of Harvard Observatory discovered the aforementioned period-luminosity relationship of the Cepheids.

      Cepheids are now considered to fall into two distinct classes. The classical Cepheids have periods from about 1.5 days to more than 50 days and belong to the class of relatively young stars found largely in the spiral arms of galaxies and called Population I (Populations I and II). Population II Cepheids are much older, less luminous, and less massive than their Population I counterparts. They fall into two groups—W Virginis stars with periods greater than about 10 days and BL Herculis stars with periods of a few days.

      Classical Cepheids exhibit a relation between period and luminosity in the sense that the longer the period of the star, the greater its intrinsic brightness; this period-luminosity relationship has been used to establish the distance of remote stellar systems. The absolute magnitude of a classical Cepheid can be estimated from its period. Once this is known, the distance of the star can be deduced from a comparison of absolute and apparent (measured) magnitudes. Population II Cepheids likewise obey a period-luminosity relationship, but it is different from that of the classical Cepheids. Since Population II Cepheids are less luminous than classical Cepheids, they are less useful as distance indicators.

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Universalium. 2010.

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