cedar


cedar
/see"deuhr/, n.
1. any of several Old World, coniferous trees of the genus Cedrus, having wide, spreading branches. Cf. cedar of Lebanon.
2. any of various junipers, as the red cedar, Juniperus virginiana, of the cypress family, having reddish-brown bark and dark-blue, berrylike fruit.
3. any of various other coniferous trees. Cf. incense cedar, white cedar.
4. any of several trees belonging to the genus Cedrela, of the mahogany family, as the Spanish cedar.
5. Also called cedarwood. the fragrant wood of any of these trees, used in furniture and as a moth repellent.
[bef. 1000; ME cedir, OE ceder < L cedrus < Gk kédros; r. ME cedre < OF < L, as above]

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I
Any of four species of tall ornamental and timber evergreen coniferous trees of the genus Cedrus, in the pine family.

Three cedars are native to mountainous areas of the Mediterranean region and one to the western Himalayas. These "true" cedars are the Atlas cedar (C. atlantica), the Cyprus cedar (C. brevifolia), the deodar (C. deodara), and the cedar of Lebanon (C. libani). Cedarwood is light, soft, resinous, and durable, even when in contact with soil or moisture. Many other conifers known as cedars resemble true cedars in being evergreen and in having aromatic, often red or red-tinged wood that in many cases is decay-resistant and insect-repellent. The giant arborvitae, incense cedar, and some junipers (red cedar) provide the familiar "cedarwood" of pencils, chests, closet linings, and fence posts. See also white cedar.

Cedar of Lebanon (Cedrus libani)

G.E. Hyde
Natural History Photographic Agency/EB Inc.
II
(as used in expressions)

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plant
      any of four species of ornamental and timber evergreen conifers of the genus Cedrus (family Pinaceae), three native to mountainous areas of the Mediterranean region and one to the western Himalayas. Many other coniferous trees known as “cedars” resemble true cedars in being evergreen and in having aromatic, often red or red-tinged wood that in many cases is decay-resistant and insect-repellent. The giant arborvitae, incense cedar, and some junipers (viz., red cedar; q.v.) provide the familiar “cedarwood” of pencils, chests, closet linings, and fence posts; an oil distilled from the wood is used in many toiletries.

      The Atlas cedar (C. atlantica), the Cyprus cedar (C. brevifolia), the deodar (C. deodara), and the cedar of Lebanon (C. libani) are the true cedars. They are tall trees with large trunks and massive, irregular heads of spreading branches. Young trees are covered with smooth, dark-gray bark that becomes brown, fissured, and scaly with age. The needlelike, three-sided, rigid leaves are scattered along the long shoots and clustered in dense tufts at the ends of short spurs. Each leaf bears two resin canals and remains on the tree three to six years. The large, barrel-shaped, resinous female cones, greenish or purplish, are borne on short stalks; they are covered by broad, thin, closely overlapping woody scales, each with a clawlike projection.

      Cedarwood is light, soft, resinous, and durable, even when in contact with soil or moisture. It is an important structural timber in native regions but is infrequently used elsewhere. Distillation of the wood releases an aromatic oil. Many varieties of the Atlas cedar and the deodar are popular ornamentals in North America, especially along the Pacific and Gulf coasts.

      Distinctions between the four species of true cedar are often difficult to define. Interbreeding occurs, and some authorities consider the four to be geographical variants of one species, usually the cedar of Lebanon.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Cedar — (engl.: Zeder) steht für Orte in den Vereinigten Staaten: Cedar (Arizona) Cedar (Idaho) Cedar (Indiana) Cedar (Iowa) Cedar (Kansas) Cedar (Maine) Cedar (Massachusetts) Cedar (Michigan) Cedar (Minnesota) Cedar (Oklahoma) Cedar (Utah) Sonstiges:… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • CEDAR — (Heb. אֶרֶז, erez), the Cedrus libani. The cedar formerly covered extensive areas of the Lebanon mountains. In biblical times, potentates used cedar wood in the construction of palaces and other major buildings (cf. Isa. 9:9). The cedar was… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • cedar — ce dar (s[=e] d[ e]r), n. [AS. ceder, fr. L. cedrus, Gr. ke dros.] (Bot.) The name of several evergreen trees. The wood is remarkable for its durability and fragrant odor. [1913 Webster] Note: The cedar of Lebanon is the {Cedrus Libani}; the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • cedar — cȅdar m <G dra, N mn dri> DEFINICIJA bot. zimzeleno stablo (Cedrus sp.) iz porodice borova (Pinaceae) [libanonski cedar; atlantski cedar; japanski cedar]; kedar ETIMOLOGIJA lat. cedrus ← grč. kédros …   Hrvatski jezični portal

  • cedar — [sē′dər] n. [ME & OFr cedre < L cedrus < Gr kedros < ? IE base * ked , to smoke, be sooty] 1. any of a genus (Cedrus) of widespreading coniferous trees of the pine family, having clusters of needlelike leaves, cones, and durable wood… …   English World dictionary

  • Cedar — Administration Pays  Canada Province …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Cedar — Cedar, 1) Grafschaft im südwestlichsten Theile des Staates Missouri der Vereinigten Staaten von Nordamerika, 20 QM.; Flüsse: Sac River u. Cedar u. Horse Creeks; Boden hügelig u. mäßig fruchtbar; Producte: Mais, Weizen, Hafer, Rindvieh, Schweine;… …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

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  • Cedar, KS — U.S. city in Kansas Population (2000): 26 Housing Units (2000): 17 Land area (2000): 0.176617 sq. miles (0.457437 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 0.176617 sq. miles (0.457437 sq. km) FIPS code:… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • cedar — O.E. ceder, blended in M.E. with O.Fr. cedre, from L. cedrus, from Gk. kedros cedar, juniper, origin uncertain. Cedar oil was used by the Egyptians in embalming as a preservative against decay and the word for it was used figuratively for… …   Etymology dictionary

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