cavalry


cavalry
/kav"euhl ree/, n., pl. cavalries.
1. Mil.
a. the part of a military force composed of troops that serve on horseback.
b. mounted soldiers collectively.
c. the motorized, armored units of a military force organized for maximum mobility.
2. horsemen, horses, etc., collectively.
[1585-95; syncopated var. of cavallery < It cavalleria, deriv. of cavaliere CAVALIER]

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Military force mounted on horseback, formerly an important element in the armies of all major powers.

When used in combination with other military forces, its main duties included gathering information about the enemy, screening movements of its own army, pursuing a defeated enemy, striking suddenly at detected weak points, turning exposed flanks, and exploiting a penetration or breakthrough. In the late 19th century, largely because of the introduction of repeating rifles and machine guns, cavalry lost much of its former value. By World War I, a cavalry charge against a line of entrenched troops with rapid-firing small arms was suicidal. Armoured vehicles soon replaced horses, and by the 1950s no modern army had horse-mounted units. Today's units designated "cavalry" employ helicopters and light armoured vehicles in ways analogous to horse cavalry.

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      military force mounted on horseback (horse), formerly an important element in the armies of all major powers. When employed as part of a combined military formation, its main duties included observing and reporting information about the enemy, screening movements of its own force, pursuing and demoralizing a defeated enemy, maintaining a constant threat to an enemy's rear area, striking suddenly at detected weak points, turning exposed flanks, and exploiting a penetration or breakthrough.

      During the latter part of the 19th century, largely as a result of the introduction of repeating rifles and machine guns, the cavalry lost much of its former value. By the time of World War I, a cavalry charge against entrenched troops armed with rapid-firing small arms was suicidal. Cavalry organizations soon abandoned horses for armoured fighting vehicles and became known as mechanized cavalry or armoured cavalry. By the 1950s there were no horse-mounted cavalry units in either the U.S. or British armies. In the early 1960s the United States converted its 1st Cavalry Division to an “air mobile” division, with helicopters and air-portable weapons and vehicles. The division saw extensive service in Vietnam.

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Universalium. 2010.

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