cauliflower


cauliflower
/kaw"leuh flow'euhr, -lee-, kol"euh-, kol"ee-/, n.
1. a form of cultivated plant, Brassica oleracea botrytis, of the mustard family, whose inflorescence forms a compact, usually whitish head. Cf. broccoli.
2. this head, used as a vegetable.
[1590-1600; < L cauli(s) COLE + FLOWER; r. coleflorie < It ca(v)olfiore, equiv. to cavol cole + fiore < L flori- (s. of flos) flower]

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Form of cabbage (Brassica oleracea, Botrytis group) in the mustard family, consisting of a compact terminal mass of greatly thickened, modified, and partially developed flower structures, together with their embracing fleshy stalks.

This terminal cluster forms a firm, white, succulent "curd" that is served as a cooked vegetable and is highly nutritious. The separated flower structures are also eaten raw.

Cauliflower (Brassica oleracea, Botrytis group).

Derek Fell

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plant
 (Brassica oleracea, Botrytis group) form of cabbage, of the mustard family (Brassicaceae), consisting of a compact terminal mass of greatly thickened, modified, and partially developed flower structures, together with their subtending fleshy stalks.

      As desired for food, this terminal cluster forms a firm, white, succulent “curd.” The broad, much-elongated leaves extend far above this curd. In most varieties the leaves must be tied together well above the curd, or broken over it, several days before harvest to prevent discoloration of the curd by sunlight.

      Cauliflower is frequently served as a cooked vegetable, and the separated flower structures are also used in salads and as relishes in raw form.

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Universalium. 2010.