calico


calico
/kal"i koh'/, n., pl. calicoes, calicos, adj.
n.
1. a plain-woven cotton cloth printed with a figured pattern, usually on one side.
2. Brit. plain white cotton cloth.
3. an animal having a spotted or particolored coat.
4. Obs. a figured cotton cloth from India.
adj.
5. made of calico.
6. resembling printed calico; spotted or mottled.
[1495-1505; short for Calico cloth, var. of CALICUT CLOTH, named after city in India which orig. exported it]

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 all-cotton fabric woven in plain, or tabby, weave and printed with simple designs in one or more colours. Calico originated in Calicut, India, by the 11th century, if not earlier, and in the 17th and 18th centuries calicoes were an important commodity traded between India and Europe.

      In the 12th century, Hemacandra, an Indian writer, mentions chhimpa, or calico prints, decorated with chhapanti, or a printed lotus design. The earliest fragments to survive (15th century) have been found not in India but at Fusṭāṭ, in the neighbourhood of Cairo. The examples, resist-dyed (in which parts of the fabric to be left undyed are covered with a substance that resists the dye) and block-printed, are of Gujarāti manufacture. In the Mughal period the chief centres of calico printing were in Gujarāt, Rājasthān, and in Burhānpur, in the Khāndesh region of Madhya Pradesh. Ahmādābād, another centre, specialized in cheaper printed cottons.

      In the export trade, patterns pleasing to foreign taste were used, but for home consumption simpler designs, consisting of small flowers and pinecone, diaper (allover), and geometrical patterns, were most popular. Gold tinseling was sometimes used to enhance the sumptuousness of the material. Printed calicoes were generally used for hangings and bedcovers, as well as for dresses in England, but in India the material was generally used only for garments. Saris, the most common article of the Indian woman's dress, were almost always printed.

      In calico weaving, one set of warp threads is woven one-over and one-under with one set of weft threads. Calico fabrics are usually woven in the gray state—i.e., in the natural colour of the raw cotton staple.

      A considerable amount of calico is bleached, dyed, and printed for every conceivable household use and for articles of clothing. Generally, calicoes are in two colours, one for the ground and the other for the figure or design. The ground colour is usually piece-dyed in some solid colour and the design printed on the cloth later by means of a revolving cylinder on which the design has been stamped or cut out. Calico fabrics include an infinite variety of textures and qualities according to the different uses for which they are intended, ranging from fairly fine and sheer to those of coarser and stronger textures.

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Universalium. 2010.

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