butter


butter
butterless, adj.butterlike, adj.
/but"euhr/, n.
1. the fatty portion of milk, separating as a soft whitish or yellowish solid when milk or cream is agitated or churned.
2. this substance, processed for cooking and table use.
3. any of various other soft spreads for bread: apple butter; peanut butter.
4. any of various substances of butterlike consistency, as various metallic chlorides, and certain vegetable oils solid at ordinary temperatures.
v.t.
5. to put butter on or in; spread or grease with butter.
6. to apply a liquefied bonding material to (a piece or area), as mortar to a course of bricks.
7. Metalworking. to cover (edges to be welded together) with a preliminary surface of the weld metal.
8. butter up, Informal. to flatter someone in order to gain a favor: He suspected that they were buttering him up when everyone suddenly started being nice to him.
[bef. 1000; ME; OE butere < L butyrum < Gk boútyron]

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Solid emulsion of fat globules and water made by churning cream, used as a food.

Presumably known since the advent of animal husbandry, butter has long been used as a cooking fat and as a spread. It was traditionally a farm product, but with the advent of the cream separator in the late 19th century it began to be mass-produced. It is a high-energy food, containing about 715 calories per 100 grams. It is high in butterfat (80–85%) and low in protein. Colouring is sometimes added to enhance its natural yellow colour (from carotene), and salt is often added.

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      a yellow-to-white solid emulsion of fat globules, water, and inorganic salts produced by churning the cream from cows' milk. Butter has long been used as a spread and as a cooking fat. It is an important edible fat in northern Europe, North America, and other places where cattle are the primary dairy animals. In all, about a third of the world's milk production is devoted to making butter.

      Butter is a high-energy food, containing approximately 715 calories per 100 grams. It has a high content of butterfat, or milk fat (at least 80 percent), but is low in protein. Butter has substantial amounts of vitamin A and minor amounts of calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D. The colour of butter is caused by carotene and other fat-soluble pigments in the fat. In the United States vegetable colour can be added to commercial butter in order to improve yellowness. Whipped butter, made by whipping air or nitrogen gas into soft butter, is intended to spread more easily at refrigeration temperatures.

      The origin of butter is unknown, but presumably it dates back to the prehistoric stages of animal husbandry. With the advent of the cream separator in the late 19th century, the manufacture of butter moved from the farm to the factory. Continuous butter making, introduced after World War II, increased the efficiency and output of butter manufacture. There are two methods of continuous buttermaking: one involving the accelerated churning of normal cream and the other the utilization of reseparated high-fat cream. Well-made butter should be uniformly firm, waxy, and easy to slice and spread.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

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