bugle


bugle
bugle1
bugler, n.
/byooh"geuhl/, n., v., bugled, bugling.
n.
1. a brass wind instrument resembling a cornet and sometimes having keys or valves, used typically for sounding military signals.
v.i.
2. to sound a bugle.
3. (of bull elks) to utter a rutting call.
v.t.
4. to call by or with a bugle: to bugle reveille.
[1250-1300; ME bugle (horn) instrument made of an ox horn < AF, OF < L buculus bullock, young ox, equiv. to bu- var. s. of bos ox + -culus -CLE1]
bugle2
/byooh"geuhl/, n.
ajuga.
[1225-75; ME < OF < ML bugula a kind of plant]
bugle3
/byooh"geuhl/, n.
1. Also called bugle bead. a tubular glass bead used for ornamenting dresses.
adj.
2. Also, bugled. ornamented with bugles.
[1570-80; of obscure orig.]

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Soprano brass instrument historically used for hunting and military signaling.

It developed from an 18th-century semicircular German hunting horn with widely expanding bore. In the 19th century the semicircle was reshaped into an oblong double loop. Natural bugles use only harmonics 2–6 (producing tones of the C triad) in their calls ("Reveille," "Taps," etc.). The keyed bugle, patented in 1810, has six sideholes and keys which give it a complete chromatic scale. In the 1820s valves were added to produce the flügelhorn and, in lower ranges, the baritone, euphonium, and saxhorns.

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      wind instrument sounded by the vibration of the lips against a cup mouthpiece. As a modern military signaling instrument, it dates from about 1750, when Hanoverian Jäger (light infantry) battalions adopted the semicircular copper horn with widely expanding bore, used by the Flügelmeister, an official of the hunt. English light infantry did the same, the German flügelhorn, or horn, taking the name bugle horn (from Old French bugle, derived from the Latin buculus, “bullock”). This early semicircular bugle was pitched in C or D, often lowered to B by a coiled crook, a detachable piece of tubing. From about 1800 it was once-looped in trumpet shape; the British design, twice-coiled with narrow bell, became official in 1858.

      Bugle calls require only the second to sixth notes of the natural harmonic series (notes produced by whole and partial vibration of the enclosed air column), written c′–g′–c″–e″–g″ (c′ = middle C) but sounding a tone lower. The calls are grouped as regimental calls, field calls, and routine calls. Some of the most familiar, including the reveille and the last post, remain virtually unchanged since 1815, if not earlier. Other calls, especially field calls, were originally played at a lower pitch, making use of the C below middle C (the first harmonic, or fundamental). The first official list of bugle calls was issued in 1798.

      The popularity of the bugle horn at the end of the 18th century is reflected both in the publication of many bugle marches with military band and in the featuring of the instrument in light operas. In 1810 Joseph Halliday patented the key bugle, or Royal Kent bugle, with six brass keys (five closed, one open-standing) fitted to the once-coiled bugle to give it a complete diatonic (seven-note) scale. It became a leading solo instrument in military bands until replaced by the cornet. In France it inspired the ophicleide, its bass version.

      Valves (valve) were fitted to the same once-coiled bugle during the 1820s, the new instrument keeping the old name flügelhorn. It is pitched in B♭ and remains the principal treble brass instrument of continental military and brass bands. Soprano and alto versions in E♭ are sometimes used with it. Modern instruments are considerably narrower in bore than earlier ones.

      The valved bugle also gave rise to related instruments in the tenor, baritone, and bass ranges. Their names vary from country to country and often apply to more than one instrument. They include the baritone, euphonium, and the saxhorns (some of which are also referred to as flügelhorns). These instruments also vary in the degree to which they retain the bugle's characteristic wide bore.

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Universalium. 2010.

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  • bugle — bugle …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • bugle — [ bygl ] n. m. • 1836; mot angl., empr. a. fr.→ beugler ♦ Instrument à vent à pistons (cuivres) utilisé notamment dans les fanfares. ⇒ clairon, cornet, trompette. ● bugle nom féminin (latin médiéval bugula) Labiée des bois humides, aux fleurs d… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • bugle — 1. (bu gl ) s. m. Ancien instrument de musique à vent, et aujourd hui, spécialement, la trompette à clefs, instrument très employé dans les musiques militaires, HISTORIQUE    XIIe s. •   Tabors et timbes et bugleraus corner, Roncisv. p. 178.… …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • Bugle — steht für: Clairon, eine Signaltrompete (englisch Bugle), auch Namensgeber von Drum and Buglecorps Guaymí oder Ngobe Bugle, ein indigenes Volk in Panama und Costa Rica Bugle (Cornwall) ein Ort in Cornwall Diese Seite …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Bugle — Bu gle, n. [OE. bugle buffalo, buffalo s horn, OF. bugle, fr. L. buculus a young bullock, steer, dim. of bos ox. See {Cow} the animal.] A sort of wild ox; a buffalo. E. Phillips. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Bugle — Bu gle, n. [See {Bugle} a wild ox.] 1. A horn used by hunters. [1913 Webster] 2. (Mus.) A copper instrument of the horn quality of tone, shorter and more conical that the trumpet, sometimes keyed; formerly much used in military bands, very rarely …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Bugle — Bu gle, a. [From {Bugle} a bead.] Jet black. Bugle eyeballs. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Bugle — Bu gle, n. [F. bugle; cf. It. bugola, L. bugillo.] (Bot.) A plant of the genus {Ajuga} of the Mint family, a native of the Old World. [1913 Webster] {Yellow bugle}, the {Ajuga cham[ae]pitys}. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • bugle — (Del fr. bugle, este del ingl. bugle [horn], cuerno de caza, porque se hacía con cuerno de búfalo, y este del lat. bucŭlus, buey joven). m. Instrumento musical de viento, formado por un largo tubo cónico de metal, arrollado de distintas maneras y …   Diccionario de la lengua española

  • bugle — mid 14c., abbreviation of buglehorn drinking horn, hunting horn (c.1300), from O.Fr. bugle wild ox, buffalo, from L. buculus heifer, young ox, dim. of bos ox, cow (see COW (Cf. cow)) …   Etymology dictionary

  • bugle — (izg. bjȕgl) m DEFINICIJA lovački rog ili truba bez ventila, signalni vojnički rog [puhati u bugle] ETIMOLOGIJA engl …   Hrvatski jezični portal