bottle


bottle
bottle1
bottlelike, adj.
/bot"l/, n., v., bottled, bottling.
n.
1. a portable container for holding liquids, characteristically having a neck and mouth and made of glass or plastic.
2. the contents of such a container; as much as such a container contains: a bottle of wine.
3. bottled cow's milk, milk formulas, or substitute mixtures given to infants instead of mother's milk: raised on the bottle.
4. hit the bottle, Slang. to drink alcohol to excess often or habitually.
5. the bottle, intoxicating beverages; liquor: He became addicted to the bottle.
v.t.
6. to put into or seal in a bottle: to bottle grape juice.
7. Brit. to preserve (fruit or vegetables) by heating to a sufficient temperature and then sealing in a jar.
8. bottle up,
a. to repress, control, or restrain: He kept all of his anger bottled up inside him.
b. to enclose or entrap: Traffic was bottled up in the tunnel.
[1325-75; ME botel < AF; OF bo(u)teille < ML butticula, equiv. to LL butti(s) BUTT4 + -cula -CULE1]
bottle2
/bot"l/, n. Archit.
boltel (def. 2).

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      narrow-necked, rigid or semirigid container that is primarily used to hold liquids and semiliquids. It usually has a close-fitting stopper or cap to protect the contents from spills, evaporation, or contact with foreign substances.

      Although early bottles were made from such materials as gourds and animal skins, glass eventually became the major material employed. Before 1500 BC the Egyptians produced glass bottles by covering silica paste cores with molten glass and digging out the core after the bottle hardened. By 200 BC glassblowing was practiced in China, Persia (modern Iran), and Egypt. Except for making the finest and most costly decorative bottles, hand methods were eventually replaced by processes employing metal molds, and automatic equipment for the continuous manufacture of bottles was introduced commercially in 1903.

      Glass bottles afford highly effective protection of their contents and are attractive because of their transparency and high gloss and the variety of shapes attainable. Fragility is a major disadvantage, and only coloured glass protects those products sensitive to the action of light. Returnable glass bottles, which can be reused a number of times, are the least expensive to manufacture on a per use basis; although repeated handling costs may dissipate any saving. Lightweight, nonreturnable types achieved popularity in the 1960s, but by the 1970s returnable bottles were being promoted as one means of combating the ecological problem of disposal of solid wastes.

       plastic bottles, made from raw materials derived from petroleum and manufactured much like glass types, offer the advantage of breakage resistance and lightness, and their contents often can be dispensed by squeezing. In some applications they are less effective than glass in product protection and lack the attractive gloss and transparency of glass. Their disposal contributes to pollution, because few plastic containers disintegrate upon exposure to the elements. Beginning in the mid-1990s, plastic recycling, especially for the commonly used high-density polyethylene and polyethylene terephthalate bottles, was instituted to reduce the solid-waste problem.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Bottle — Bot tle, n. [OE. bote, botelle, OF. botel, bouteille, F. bouteille, fr. LL. buticula, dim. of butis, buttis, butta, flask. Cf. {Butt} a cask.] 1. A hollow vessel, usually of glass or earthenware (but formerly of leather), with a narrow neck or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • bottle — ► NOUN 1) a container with a narrow neck, used for storing liquids. 2) Brit. informal one s courage or confidence. ► VERB 1) place in bottles for storage. 2) (bottle up) repress or conceal (one s feelings). 3) ( …   English terms dictionary

  • bottle — bottle1 [bät′ l] n. [ME botel < MFr botele < OFr < ML butticula, dim. of LL buttis, a cask] 1. a container, esp. for liquids, made of glass, plastic, etc. and having a relatively narrow neck 2. the amount that a bottle holds 3. milk from …   English World dictionary

  • Bottle — Bot tle, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Bottled}p. pr. & vb. n. {Bottling}.] To put into bottles; to inclose in, or as in, a bottle or bottles; to keep or restrain as in a bottle; as, to bottle wine or porter; to bottle up one s wrath. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • bottle up — (something) 1. to not express something. She bottled up her emotions throughout the tournament. The more you bottle that anger up, the more likely it is that it will explode. 2. to keep something from making progress. The French navy had bottled… …   New idioms dictionary

  • bottle it — british informal phrase to not do something because you do not feel brave enough He tried to jump, but he bottled it. Thesaurus: to not act, or to not do somethingsynonym to be, or to become afraid or frightenedsynonym Main entry …   Useful english dictionary

  • bottle — [n] container, usually for liquids canteen, carafe, cruet, dead soldier*, decanter, ewer, flagon, flask, glass, jar, jug, phial, soldier, urn, vacuum bottle, vial; concept 494 …   New thesaurus

  • Bottle — Bot tle, n. [OE. botel, OF. botel, dim. of F. botte; cf. OHG. bozo bunch. See {Boss} stud.] A bundle, esp. of hay. [Obs. or Prov. Eng.] Chaucer. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • bottle up — index repress Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • bottle up — [v] keep feeling inside oneself box up, check, collar, contain, coop up, corner, cramp, curb, keep back, restrain, restrict, shut in, suppress, trap; concept 35 Ant. confide, reveal, tell …   New thesaurus

  • Bottle — This article is about bottles in general. For baby bottles, see Baby bottle. Composite body, painted, and glazed bottle. Dated 16th century. From Iran. New York Metropolitan Museum of Art …   Wikipedia


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