bonsai


bonsai
/bon suy", -zuy", bohn-, bon"suy, -zuy, bohn"-/, n., pl. bonsai.
1. a tree or shrub that has been dwarfed, as by pruning the roots and pinching, and is grown in a pot or other container and trained to produce a desired shape or effect.
2. the art or hobby of developing and growing such a plant or plants.
[1945-50; < Japn bon-sai tray planting < MChin, equiv. to Chin pén tray + zai plant, shoot]

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(Japanese: "tray planting") Living dwarf tree or trees; also, the art of training and growing them in containers.

Bonsai specimens are ordinary trees and shrubs, not hereditary dwarfs; they are dwarfed by a system of pruning roots and branches and training branches by tying them with wire. The art originated in China but has been pursued and developed primarily by the Japanese. The direct inspiration for bonsai is found in nature, in trees that grow in harsh, rocky places and are dwarfed and gnarled throughout their existence. Prized characteristics are an aged-looking trunk and branches and weathered-looking exposed upper roots. Bonsai may live for a century or more and are handed down from one generation to another as valued family possessions. Bonsai pots, usually earthenware and of variable shape, are carefully chosen to harmonize in colour and proportion with the tree. A sizable bonsai industry exists as part of the nursery industry in Japan; California is home to a small-scale bonsai industry.

Bonsai pine.

Judith Groffman

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      (Japanese: “tray-planted”), living dwarf tree or trees or the art of training and growing them in containers.

      Bonsai specimens are ordinary trees and shrubs, not hereditary dwarfs; they are dwarfed by a system of pruning roots and branches and training branches by tying with wire. The art originated in China, where, perhaps over 1,000 years ago, trees were cultivated in trays, wooden containers, and earthenware pots and trained in naturalistic shapes. Bonsai, however, has been pursued and developed primarily by the Japanese (arts, East Asian). The first Japanese record of dwarfed potted trees is in the Kasuga-gongen-genki, a picture scroll by Takashina Takakane (1309).

      The direct inspiration for bonsai is found in nature. Trees that grow in rocky crevices of high mountains, or that overhang cliffs, remain dwarfed and gnarled throughout their existence. The Japanese prize in bonsai an aged appearance of the trunk and branches and a weathered character in the exposed upper roots. These aesthetic qualities are seen to embody the philosophical concept of the mutability of all things.

      Bonsai may live for a century or more, and be handed down from one generation to another as valued family possessions. Aesthetics of scale call for short needles on conifers and relatively small leaves on deciduous trees. Small-flowered, small-fruited varieties of trees are favoured. Open space between branches and between masses of foliage are also important aesthetically. In diminutive forests the lower portions of the trunks should be bare.

      Good bonsai specimens are usually hardy species that can be kept outdoors the year round wherever winters are mild. They can be brought into the house occasionally for appreciation and enjoyment. In Japan they are customarily displayed in an alcove or on small tables in a living room and later returned to their outdoor bonsai stands.

      The selection of the appropriate container in which to cultivate a bonsai is an essential element of the art. Bonsai pots are usually earthenware, with or without a colourful exterior glaze. They may be round, oval, square, rectangular, octagonal, or lobed and have one or more drainage holes in the bottom. Containers are carefully chosen to harmonize in colour and proportion with the tree. If the container is rectangular or oval, the tree is planted not quite halfway between the midpoint and one side, according to the spread of the branches. In a square or round container the tree is placed slightly off centre, except for cascade types, which are planted toward the opposite side of the container from which they overhang. Bonsai are trained to have a front, or viewing side, oriented toward the observer when on exhibit.

      Miniature bonsai range up to 2 inches (5 centimetres) in height, and, started from seeds or cuttings, take three to five years to come to quality stage. They may live several decades. Small bonsai, 2 to 6 in. in height, require 5 to 10 or more years to train. Medium bonsai, 6 to 12 in. in height, or average bonsai, up to about 2 feet (60 centimetres), can be produced in as little as three years.

      Naturally dwarfed trees collected in the wild frequently fail to adapt to cultivation as bonsai because of the severe shock brought about by the change of environment and substrate.

      Bonsai must be repotted every one to five years, depending on the species and extent of root growth. Gradual root pruning during transplanting in subsequent years reduces the size of the soil ball so that the tree can ultimately go into the desired small and shallow container. Water is provided as frequently as for other plants; liquid fertilizer is also used. Pruning and nipping of shoots is performed through the growing season.

      A bonsai industry of considerable size exists as part of the nursery industry in sections of Japan; the technique is also pursued on a small industrial scale in California.

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Universalium. 2010.

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