Black Hawk


Black Hawk
1767-1838, American Indian chief of the Sauk tribe: leader of Sauk and Fox Indians in the Black Hawk War.

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born 1767, Sauk Sautenuk, Va.
died Oct. 3, 1838, village on the Des Moines River, Iowa, U.S.

Sauk Indian leader.

Long antagonistic to whites, Black Hawk was driven into Iowa from Illinois in 1831. Defying the government orders to vacate villages along the Rock River in Illinois, he led a faction of Sauk and Fox Indians back across the Mississippi River the following year. This act led to the brief but tragic Black Hawk War of 1832. He himself survived the final battle, a massacre. The ruthlessness of the war so affected neighbouring Indian groups that by 1837 most had fled far west, leaving most of the Northwest Territory to white settlers.

Black Hawk, oil painting by George Catlin, 1832; in the National Museum of American Art, ...

By courtesy of National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.

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▪ Sauk and Fox leader
Indian name  Ma-ka-tai-me-she-kia-kiak 
born 1767, Sauk Sautenuk, Virginia Colony
died October 3, 1838, village on the Des Moines River, Iowa
 leader of a faction of Sauk and Fox Indians. Supported by part of the two tribes, Black Hawk contested the disposition of 50 million acres (20 million hectares) of territory that had supposedly been granted to the United States by tribal spokesmen in 1804. His decision to defy government orders to vacate tribal villages and fertile fields along the Rock River in Illinois resulted in the brief but tragic Black Hawk War of 1832.

      Antagonistic to whites settling in his people's territory, Black Hawk joined the British in a number of engagements in the War of 1812. Thereafter U.S. officials cultivated Keokuk, a rival chief, and thus incensed Black Hawk and confirmed him in his opposition to them. For a time Keokuk's moderation prevailed, but as white men continued taking over the Indians' cornfields and lodges, dissident Sauk and Fox Indians looked to Black Hawk for leadership.

      In 1832 Black Hawk, who had been driven into Iowa the year before, led his people back across the Mississippi to the disputed Illinois area to plant crops and to resist further white encroachments. That the band of 1,000 included old men, women, and children shows that the move was not warlike. But Governor John Reynolds called out the Illinois militia, and the U.S. government dispatched troops.

      Black Hawk's band first caught the Illinois militia unawares and inflicted a stinging defeat on them. But the Indians' strength soon waned. Expected aid from other tribes did not materialize; food supplies were quickly exhausted; and desertions, malnutrition, and illness took their toll. Black Hawk retreated northward through the Rock River valley, and in the final battle, or massacre, at the Bad Axe River in Wisconsin, most of the Indians were slaughtered. Black Hawk escaped, but he was soon captured and taken, first to Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, and then to Fortress Monroe in Virginia. In 1833 he was returned as a hostage to Keokuk's charge, a final blow to his pride from which he never recovered. His own story is told in Life of Ma-ka-tai-me-she-kia-kiak (1833).

      As a condition of peace, the United States dispossessed the Sauk and Fox of their land in Illinois and eastern Iowa, and the Winnebago of theirs in southern Wisconsin. The ruthlessness of the Black Hawk War so affected the Indians that by 1837 all surrounding tribes had fled to the far West, leaving most of the Northwest Territory to the white settlers.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Black Hawk — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Black Hawk (o Blackhawk o Blackhawks) puede referirse a: Contenido 1 Personajes 2 Lugares 3 Lagos 4 …   Wikipedia Español

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  • Black Hawk —   [ blæk hɔːk; englisch »Schwarzer Falke«], eigentlich Black Sparrow Hawk, indianischer Name Ma ka tai me she kia kiak, Häuptling der Sauk Indianer, * 1767, ✝ am Des Moines River (Iowa) 3. 10. 1838; kämpfte zusammen mit Tecumseh im britisch… …   Universal-Lexikon

  • Black Hawk — Black Hawk, CO U.S. city in Colorado Population (2000): 118 Housing Units (2000): 79 Land area (2000): 1.457992 sq. miles (3.776181 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 1.457992 sq. miles (3.776181 sq …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Black Hawk, CO — U.S. city in Colorado Population (2000): 118 Housing Units (2000): 79 Land area (2000): 1.457992 sq. miles (3.776181 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 1.457992 sq. miles (3.776181 sq. km) FIPS code …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Black Hawk — Black′ Hawk n. amh. +big 1767–1838, American Indian chief of the Sauk tribe; leader in the Black Hawk War 1831–32 …   From formal English to slang

  • Black Hawk — 1767 1838; chief of the Sauk people: leader in the Black Hawk War against the U.S. (1832) …   English World dictionary

  • Black-Hawk — (spr. Bläck Hak), Canton im Staate Iowa in den Vereinigten Staaten von NAmerika; 26 QM. groß; Boden eben u. fruchtbar, meist Prairieland; 200 Ew …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

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