birch


birch
/berrch/, n.
1. any tree or shrub of the genus Betula, comprising species with a smooth, laminated outer bark and close-grained wood. Cf. birch family.
2. the wood itself.
3. a birch rod, or a bundle of birch twigs, used esp. for whipping.
adj.
4. birchen.
v.t.
5. to beat or punish with or as if with a birch: The young ruffians were birched soundly by their teacher.
[bef. 900; ME birche, OE birce; c. OHG birka (G Birke); akin to Skt bhurja kind of birch]

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Any of about 40 species of short-lived ornamental and timber trees and shrubs of the genus Betula, the largest genus of the family Betulaceae, which also contains alders, filberts, Carpinus (hornbeam), and the genera Ostrya and Ostryopsis.

Birches are found throughout cool regions of the Northern Hemisphere; other members of the family Betulaceae are found in temperate and subarctic areas of the Northern Hemisphere, in tropical mountains, and in South America through the Andes as far south as Argentina. Leaves are simple, serrate, and alternate; male and female flowers (catkins) are borne on the same plant. The fruit is a small nut or short-winged samara (dry, winged fruit). Birches produce economically important timber. Oil obtained from birch twigs smells and tastes like wintergreen and is used in tanning Russian leather (see tanning).

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plant
 any of about 40 species of short-lived ornamental and timber trees and shrubs constituting the genus Betula (family Betulaceae), distributed throughout cool regions of the Northern Hemisphere. Ivory birch (family Euphorbiaceae) and West Indian birch (family Burseraceae) are not true birches. The name bog birch is applied to a species of buckthorn, as well as to B. glandulosa.

  A birch has smooth, resinous, varicoloured or white bark, marked by horizontal pores (lenticels), which usually peels horizontally in thin sheets, especially on young trees. On older trunks the thick, deeply furrowed bark breaks into irregular plates. Short, slender branches rise to a narrow pyramidal crown on a young tree; they become horizontal, often pendulous, on an older tree. The egg-shaped or triangular, usually pointed leaves have toothed margins; they are alternately arranged on the branchlets. They are usually bright green, turning yellow in autumn. The drooping male catkins flower before the leaves emerge; smaller, upright female catkins on the same tree develop in conelike clusters, which disintegrate at maturity, releasing tiny, one-seeded, winged nutlets.

  Gray birch, paper birch, river birch, sweet birch, yellow birch, and white birch are the best known; white birch is usually called silver birch in England, but the latter name is also sometimes given to paper birch and to yellow birch. The Japanese monarch birch (B. maximowicziana) is a valuable timber tree of Japan, especially in the plywood industry. Usually 30 metres (100 feet) high, with flaking gray or orange-gray bark, it has heart-shaped leaves about 15 centimetres (6 inches) long and is a hardy ornamental. The similar Japanese cherry birch (B. grossa) also produces useful timber.

      Water birch (B. occidentalis; B. fontinalis of some authorities), a shrubby tree native to moist sites along the western coast of North America, has nonpeeling, dark-red bark; it grows in clusters, with all stems rising from a common root system. It is sometimes called red birch, black birch, or mountain birch. Swamp birch (B. pumila), a similar but smaller shrub, is found on boggy sites; it may be erect or trailing and matted. Bog birch (B. glandulosa) of North America, also called tundra dwarf birch or resin birch, and dwarf birch, or dwarf Arctic birch (B. nana), native to most far northern areas of the world, are small alpine and tundra shrubs commonly known as ground birch. Both species have almost circular leaves, are food sources for birds and grazing animals, and may be planted as ornamentals. Several Chinese birches and the Japanese white birch (B. platyphylla japonica) are sometimes used ornamentally. A few natural hybrids between trees and shrubs of the genus Betula are cultivated as ornamentals in Europe and North America.

      Pale- to red-brown birchwood is used for flooring, furniture, cabinetry, interior finishing, vehicle parts, plywood, pulp, and turnery. The thin, water-impervious bark provided roofing, canoes, and shoes for North American Indians and early settlers. Birch oil and birch beer made from sap are obtained from the trees. Woodsmen rely on the ability of yellow and paper birch bark to burn even when wet.

      Birches were among the first trees to become established after the glaciers receded. Hardy, quick growing, and relatively immune to disease and insect attack, they are valuable in reforestation, erosion control, and as protective cover, or nurse trees, for development of more permanent plants. Most require moist, sandy, and loamy soil; they are usually propagated by seeding or grafting. Many ornamental varieties are cultivated for their leaf colour, leaf shape, or growth habit.

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Universalium. 2010.

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  • Birch — (b[ e]rch), n.; pl. {Birches} ( [e^]z). [OE. birche, birk, AS. birce, beorc; akin to Icel. bj[ o]rk, Sw. bj[ o]rk, Dan. birk, D. berk, OHG. piricha, MHG. birche, birke, G. birke, Russ. bereza, Pol. brzoza, Serv. breza, Skr. bh[=u]rja. [root]254.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • birch — [bʉrch] n. [ME birche < OE beorc < IE base * bhereĝ , to gleam, white > BRIGHT] 1. any of a genus (Betula) of trees and shrubs of the birch family, having smooth bark easily peeled off in thin sheets, and hard, closegrained wood: found… …   English World dictionary

  • birch — birch; birch·en; birch·er; birch·ite; …   English syllables

  • birch — ► NOUN 1) a slender hardy tree having a peeling, typically silver grey or white, bark and yielding a hard fine grained wood. 2) (the birch) chiefly historical a punishment in which a person is flogged with a bundle of birch twigs. ► VERB chiefly… …   English terms dictionary

  • Birch — Birch, a. Of or pertaining to the birch; birchen. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Birch — Birch, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Birched} (b[ e]rcht); p. pr. & vb. n. {Birching}.] To whip with a birch rod or twig; to flog. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Birch — Birch, 1) (spr. börtsch) Samuel, engl. Sprachforscher und Archäolog, geb. 3. Nov. 1813 in London, gest. daselbst 27. Dez. 1885, besuchte die Schulen zu Greenwich und Blackheath, dann die Merchant Taylors School in London, wurde 1836 Assistent,… …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

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  • birch|en — «BUR chuhn», adjective. 1. of a birch tree. 2. made of birchwood. 3. having to do with the birch used in punishing …   Useful english dictionary

  • birch — [ bɜrtʃ ] noun 1. ) count a tall tree with thin branches and an outer layer that comes off in thin strips like paper a ) uncount the wood from this tree 2. ) the birch BRITISH an old fashioned form of CORPORAL PUNISHMENT in which someone is hit… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English


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