bilingualism


bilingualism
/buy ling"gweuh liz'euhm/ or, Can., /-ling"gyooh euh-/, n.
1. the ability to speak two languages fluently.
2. the habitual use of two languages.
3. Canadian. a government-supported program encouraging all citizens to acquire a knowledge of both English and French.
Also, bilinguality /buy'ling gwal"i tee/ or, Can., /-ling gyooh al"-/.
[1870-75; BILINGUAL + -ISM]

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Ability to speak two languages.

It may be acquired early by children in regions where most adults speak two languages (e.g., French and dialectal German in Alsace). Children may also become bilingual by learning languages in two different social settings; for example, British children in British India learned an Indian language from their nurses and family servants. A second language can also be acquired in school. Bilingualism can also refer to the use of two languages in teaching, especially to foster learning in students trying to learn a new language. Advocates of bilingual education in the U.S. argue that it speeds learning in all subjects for children who speak a foreign language at home and prevents them from being marginalized in English-language schools. Detractors counter that it hinders such children from mastering the language of the larger society and limits their opportunities for employment and higher education.

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      Ability to speak two languages. It may be acquired early by children in regions where most adults speak two languages (e.g., French and dialectal German in Alsace). Children may also become bilingual by learning languages in two different social settings; for example, British children in British India learned an Indian language from their nurses and family servants. A second language can also be acquired in school. Bilingualism can also refer to the use of two languages in teaching, especially to foster learning in students trying to learn a new language. Advocates of bilingual education in the U.S. argue that it speeds learning in all subjects for children who speak a foreign language at home and prevents them from being marginalized in English-language schools. Detractors counter that it hinders such children from mastering the language of the larger society and limits their opportunities for employment and higher education.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Bilingualism — Bi*lin gual*ism, n. Quality of being bilingual. [1913 Webster] The bilingualism of King s English. Earle. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • bilingualism — (n.) 1873, from BILINGUAL (Cf. bilingual) + ISM (Cf. ism) …   Etymology dictionary

  • bilingualism — [[t]baɪlɪ̱ŋgwəlɪzəm[/t]] N UNCOUNT Bilingualism is the ability to speak two languages equally well …   English dictionary

  • bilingualism — bilingual ► ADJECTIVE 1) speaking two languages fluently. 2) expressed in or using two languages. DERIVATIVES bilingualism noun …   English terms dictionary

  • bilingualism — noun Date: 1873 1. the ability to speak two languages 2. the frequent use (as by a community) of two languages 3. the political or institutional recognition of two languages …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • bilingualism — См. bilinguismo …   Пятиязычный словарь лингвистических терминов

  • bilingualism — noun The condition of being bilingual; the ability to speak two languages. See Also: monolingualism, trilingualism, multilingualism …   Wiktionary

  • bilingualism — n. command of two languages, equal ability in two languages; government policy of having two national languages …   English contemporary dictionary

  • bilingualism — bi·lin·gual·ism …   English syllables

  • bilingualism — See: bilingual …   English dictionary


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