Belgrade


Belgrade
/bel"grayd, -grahd, -grad, bel grayd", -grahd", -grad"/, n.
a city in and the capital of Yugoslavia and the republic of Serbia, at the confluence of the Danube and Sava rivers. 1,209,360. Serbo-Croatian, Beograd.

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City (pop., 1999: 1,168,454), capital of the republic of Serbia and federal capital of Serbia and Montenegro (formerly Yugoslavia).

Lying at the juncture of the Danube and Sava rivers, it is one of the Balkans' most important commercial and transportation centres. Inhabited by Celts in the 4th century BC, it was later taken by the Romans and named Singidunum. It was destroyed by the Avars in the 6th century. In the 11th century AD it became a frontier town of Byzantium, and in the 13th century came under the rule of Serbia. The Ottoman Turks besieged the city in the 15th century, and the forces of Süleyman I finally took it in 1521; it was held almost continuously by the Turks into the 19th century. It became the capital of the kingdom of Serbia in 1882 and, after World War I, of the new Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes (renamed Yugoslavia in 1929). It suffered severely under Nazi occupation (1941–44). It was damaged by NATO bombers in the Kosovo conflict (1999). Yugoslavia underwent many border changes in the 20th century and was renamed Serbia and Montenegro in 2003.

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Serbia
Serbo-Croatian  Beograd (“White Fortress”) 
  city, capital of Serbia. It lies at the confluence of the Danube (Danube River) and Sava (Sava River) rivers. Belgrade is located at the convergence of three historically important routes of travel between Europe and the Balkans: an east-west route along the Danube River valley from Vienna to the Black Sea; another that runs westward along the valley of the Sava River toward Trieste and northern Italy; and a third running southeast along the valleys of the Morava and Vardar rivers to the Aegean Sea. To the north and west of Belgrade lies the Pannonian Basin, which includes the great grain-growing region of Vojvodina.

      There is evidence of Stone Age settlements in the area. The city grew up around an ancient fortress on the Kalemegdan headland that was encompassed on three sides by the Sava and the Danube. The first fortress was built by the Celts in the 4th century BC and was known by the Romans as Singidunum. It was destroyed by the Huns in 442 and changed hands among the Sarmatians, Goths, and Gepidae before it was recaptured by the Byzantine emperor Justinian. It was later held by the Franks and the Bulgars, and in the 11th century became a frontier town of Byzantium. In 1284 it came under Serbian rule, and in 1402 Stephen Lazarević made it the capital of Serbia. The Ottoman Turks besieged the city in 1440, and after 1521 it was in their hands except for three periods of occupation by the Austrians (1688–90, 1717–39, and 1789–91).

      During the Turkish period Belgrade was a lively commercial centre where goods were traded from various parts of the Ottoman Empire. After the first Serbian uprising under Karadjordje in 1804, Belgrade became the Serbian capital during 1807–13, but the Turks recaptured it. The Serbs were given control of the citadel in 1867, when Belgrade once more became the capital of Serbia.

      From 1921 Belgrade was the capital of the three successive Yugoslav states, including the rump Yugoslavia. The city's rapid population growth since World War II resulted primarily from the migration from rural areas of Serbia as a consequence of industrialization. Most of the inhabitants are Serbs; the largest non-Serb groups are Croats and Montenegrins.

      Since World War II Belgrade has become an industrial city that produces motors, tractors and combines, machine tools, electrical equipment, chemicals, textiles, and building materials. It is the largest commercial centre in Serbia. Three international railroad lines pass through Belgrade, which is also served by highways and by river vessels traveling up the Danube from the Black Sea or arriving from western Europe via the Main-Danube Canal. The airport is located west of the city at Surčin.

 In the course of its growth, Belgrade spread southward and southeastward over a hilly terrain. A new district called New Belgrade (Novi Beograd) has been built on the plain west of the old city, between the Sava and Danube rivers. The old fortress of Kalemegdan is now a historical monument; its former glacis has been rebuilt as a garden, from which is seen a famous view of the plain across the Sava and the Danube. Belgrade is the site of numerous government offices and is also home to various cultural and educational institutions, including the University of Belgrade, founded in 1863. There are many museums and galleries, of which the oldest, the National Museum (Narodni Muzej), was founded in 1844. Pop. (2002) 1,120,092.
 

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Universalium. 2010.

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