beet


beet
beetlike, adj.
/beet/, n.
1. any of various biennial plants belonging to the genus Beta, of the goosefoot family, esp. B. vulgaris, having a fleshy red or white root. Cf. sugar beet.
2. the edible root of such a plant.
3. the leaves of such a plant, served as a salad or cooked vegetable.
[bef. 1000; ME bete, OE bete < L beta]

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Cultivated form of the plant Beta vulgaris of the goosefoot family (Chenopodiaceae), one of the most important vegetables.

Four distinct types are cultivated: the garden beet, as a garden vegetable; the sugar beet, a major source of sugar and commercially the most important type; the mangel-wurzel, a succulent feed for livestock; and the leaf beet, or Swiss chard, for its edible leaves. Beet greens are a source of riboflavin, iron, and vitamins A and C. Beets are grown most extensively in temperate to cool regions or during the cooler seasons.

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plant
      cultivated form of the plant Beta vulgaris of the goosefoot family (Chenopodiaceae), one of the most important vegetables. Four distinct types are cultivated for four different purposes: (1) the garden beet, or beetroot, or table beet, as a garden vegetable; (2) the sugar beet, a major source of sugar; (3) the mangel-wurzel, or mangold, a succulent feed for livestock; and (4) the leaf beet, or Swiss chard, for its leaves, which may be eaten or used as a seasoning.

      The garden beet is grown for the thick, fleshy taproot that forms during the first season. In the second season a tall, branched, leafy stem arises to bear clusters of minute green flowers that develop into brown, corky fruits commonly called seedballs. The taproot ranges in shape from flattened oblate, through globular and somewhat conical, to long tapered. Skin and flesh colours are usually dark to dark-purplish red, with some nearly white. On cooking the colour diffuses uniformly through the flesh. In the United States the garden beet is popularly eaten cooked or pickled; borscht is a classic beet soup of eastern Europe.

      The sugar beet, commercially the most important type, was developed in Germany in the 18th century; its European cultivation received important encouragement from Napoleon as a means of combating the British blockade of imported sugar. Today it accounts for about two-fifths of the world's sugar production; major producers are Ukraine, Russia, the United States, France, Poland, Germany, Turkey, Italy, Romania, and the United Kingdom.

      Cultivation of the mangel-wurzel and the leaf beet, in common with most crop plants, dates from prehistoric times.

      Beets grow best on deep, friable soils that are high in organic matter; they respond well to chemical fertilizers and manures. Grown extensively under irrigation, beets tolerate relatively high salt content of the soil but are sensitive to high acidity and to low content of boron. Boron deficiency retards growth and causes black lesions in the root flesh.

      Beets are most extensively grown in temperate to cool regions or during the cooler seasons. The growing season varies from 8 to 10 weeks for garden beets in favourable climates to 30 weeks for some mangel-wurzels.

      Beet greens, a source of riboflavin, iron, and vitamins A and C, are served cooked, or, if very young, in salads; they should be fresh and tender when selected. Beet roots should be smooth, firm, and unblemished; medium-sized specimens are the most tender. They are frequently canned, either whole or cut up, and often pickled, spiced, or served in a sweet-and-sour sauce.

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Universalium. 2010.

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