bee


bee
bee1
beelike, adj.
/bee/, n.
1. any hymenopterous insect of the superfamily Apoidea, including social and solitary species of several families, as the bumblebees, honeybees, etc.
2. the common honeybee, Apis mellifera.
3. a community social gathering in order to perform some task, engage in a contest, etc.: a sewing bee; a spelling bee; a husking bee.
4. have a bee in one's bonnet,
a. to be obsessed with one idea.
b. to have eccentric or fanciful ideas or schemes: Our aunt obviously has a bee in her bonnet, but we're very fond of her.
5. put the bee on, Informal. to try to obtain money from, as for a loan or donation: My brother just put the bee on me for another $10.
6. the bee's knees, Older Slang. (esp. in the 1920s) a person or thing that is wonderful, great, or marvelous: Her new roadster is simply the bee's knees.
[bef. 1000; ME be(e); OE bio, beo; c. D bij, OS bi, bini, OHG bia, bini (G Biene), ON by; with other suffixes, Lith bìte, OPruss bitte, OCS bichela, OIr bech; *bhi- is a North European stem with the same distribution as WAX1, APPLE; put the bee on prob. an allusion to STING in sense "dupe, cheat"]
bee2
/bee/, n.
1. Also called bee block. Naut. a piece of hardwood, bolted to the side of a bowsprit, through which to reeve stays.
2. Obs. a metal ring or bracelet.
[bef. 1050; ME beh ring, OE beag, beah; c. OFris bag, OS, MLG bog, OHG boug, ON baugr, Skt bhoga-; akin to BOW1]

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Any of some 20,000 insect species belonging to the superfamily Apoidea (order Hymenoptera), including the familiar bumblebee.

Adults range in size from about 0.08 to 1.6 in. (2 mm–4 cm). Bees are related to wasps, but, unlike wasps, which can eat other insects, most bees are entirely dependent on flowers for their food. Male bees are usually short-lived and never collect pollen; female bees make and provision the nest and usually have special anatomical structures for carrying pollen. Most species are solitary. The so-called killer bee, an Africanized subspecies of Apis mellifera (see honeybee), reached the U.S. from Mexico с 1990; killer bees react quickly and attack in number. See also Karl von Frisch.

Leaf-cutting bee (Anthidium)

M.W.F. Tweedie from the Natural History Photographic Agency
EB Inc.

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insect
 any of more than 20,000 species of insects in the suborder Apocrita (order Hymenoptera) that includes the familiar honeybee (Apis) and bumblebee (Bombus and Psithyrus), as well as thousands more wasplike and flylike bees. Adults range in size from about 2 mm to 4 cm (about 0.08–1.6 inch).

      Bees are closely related to certain types of wasps (wasp), with the principal biological difference between them being that bees (except for parasitic bees) provide their young with a mixture of pollen and honey, whereas wasps feed their young animal food or provision their nests with insects or spiders. Associated with this difference in food preference are certain structural differences, the most essential being that wasps are covered with unbranched hairs, whereas bees have at least a few branched or feathered hairs to which pollen often clings.

 Bees are entirely dependent on flowers for food, which consists of pollen and nectar, the latter sometimes modified and stored as honey. There is no doubt that bees and the flowers that they pollinate evolved simultaneously. As bees go from flower to flower gathering pollen, a small amount is rubbed from their bodies and deposited on the flowers they visit. This loss of pollen is significant, for it often results in cross-pollination of plants. The practical value of bees as pollinators is enormously greater than the value of their honey and wax production.

      Male bees are usually short-lived and never collect pollen, nor do they have other responsibilities in connection with providing for the young. Female bees do all the work of nest making and provisioning and usually have special anatomical structures that assist them in carrying pollen. Most bees are polylectic, meaning that they gather pollen from a wide variety of flowers. However, some bees collect pollen only from flowers of certain families, others from flowers of certain colours. Oligolectic bees gather pollen from only a few related kinds of flowers. The mouth parts of bees, like the pollen-collecting and pollen-carrying devices, seem to be adapted to different flowers.

      Most of the Apoidea are solitary, or nonsocial, in habit and do not live in colonies. In these species each female makes her own nest (usually a burrow in the ground) and provisions it. Among such bees there are no castes. Some solitary bees make chimneys or turrets at the nest entrance, others nest in wood or in the pith of twigs or canes. Most solitary bees are short-lived as adults. Some species may be in flight only a few weeks of the year, having spent the rest of the year in their cells as eggs, larvae, pupae, and young adults.

      Solitary bees provide all of the food the larvae require to complete development when the cells are sealed. Social bees, such as the bumblebee and the honeybee, feed their young progressively. For the life cycle of social bees, see bumblebee; honeybee.

 The Apoidea includes eight families: Colletidae, which are primitive wasplike bees consisting of five or six subfamilies, about 45 genera, and some 3,000 species; Andrenidae, which are medium-sized solitary mining bees, including some parasitic species; Halictidae (mining, or burrowing, bees), the best-known of which is Dialictus zephyrus, one of many so-called sweat bees, which are attracted to perspiration; Oxaeidae, large, fast-flying bees that bear some anatomical resemblance to Andrenidae; Melittidae, bees that mark a transitional form between the lower and the higher bees; Megachilidae (leaf-cutter bee) (leaf-cutting [see photograph—>] and mason bees), noted for their elaborate nest structures; Anthophoridae (including carpenter bees and cuckoo bees), a large family that includes three subfamilies that were once considered to be subfamilies of Apidae; and Apidae (bumblebees, honeybees, and digger, or mining, bees).

      The so-called killer bee is a hybrid between an African subspecies and European subspecies of honeybee. The Africanized honeybee subspecies was accidentally released in Brazil in 1957 during an attempt to create a hybrid that would adapt to tropical climates and produce large amounts of honey. Moving northward some 200 to 300 miles (320 to 480 km) per year, the bees had reached Mexico in the 1980s and Texas by 1990. Their range today covers the greater part of the southwestern United States, including southern California, southern Nevada, and all of Arizona. In addition, an increasing number of Africanized honeybees have been observed in Florida. They have been considered responsible for hundreds of deaths. The Africanized honeybee is smaller and much less effective in pollination of plants than its European counterpart. Although it is not more venomous than the European form, it reacts much more quickly to perceived threats to the colony, attacks in number, pursues for a longer time and greater distance, and takes longer to calm down.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Bee — (b[=e]), n. [AS. be[ o]; akin to D. bij and bije, Icel. b[=y], Sw. & Dan. bi, OHG. pini, G. biene, and perh. Ir. beach, Lith. bitis, Skr. bha. [root]97.] 1. (Zo[ o]l.) An insect of the order {Hymenoptera}, and family {Apid[ae]} (the honeybees),… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • bée — [ be ] adj. f. et n. f. • XIIe ; de béer 1 ♦ Adj. f. BOUCHE BÉE : la bouche ouverte d admiration, d étonnement, de stupeur. ⇒ béant. J en suis bouche bée. ⇒ 1. baba. « Je restais là, bras ballants et bouche bée » (France). Loc. Être bouche bée… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • bee — [bi:] n [: Old English; Origin: beo] 1.) a black and yellow flying insect that makes ↑honey and can sting you ▪ a swarm of bees ▪ a bee sting 2.) have a bee in your bonnet (about sth) informal to think something is so important, so necessary etc… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • bée — 1. (bée) adj. f. Tonneaux, futailles à gueule bée, tonneaux, futailles défoncées d un côté. ÉTYMOLOGIE    Participe passé du verbe béer ou bayer (voy. bayer). SUPPLÉMENT AU DICTIONNAIRE 1. BÉE. Ajoutez : Voy. gueule, n° 4. bée 2. (bée) s. f …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • bee — ► NOUN 1) a stinging winged insect which collects nectar and pollen from flowers and produces wax and honey. 2) a meeting for communal work or amusement: a sewing bee. ● the bee s knees Cf. ↑the bee s knees ● have a bee in one s bonnet Cf. ↑ …   English terms dictionary

  • Bee — Bèe …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • bee — stinging insect, O.E. beo bee, from P.Gmc. *bion (Cf. O.N. by, O.H.G. bia, M.Du. bie), possibly from PIE root *bhi quiver. Used metaphorically for busy worker since 1530s. Sense of meeting of neighbors to unite their labor for the benefit of one… …   Etymology dictionary

  • bee — [n1] honey making, stinging insect bumblebee, drone, honey bee, killer bee, queen bee; concept 398 bee [n2] collective task communal gathering, harvest, party, social, work party; concept 362 …   New thesaurus

  • bee — bee1 [bē] n. [ME < OE beo < IE base * bhei > Ger biene, OPrus bitte, OIr bech] any of a large superfamily (Apoidea) of broad bodied, four winged, hairy hymenopteran insects that gather pollen and nectar, have biting as well as sucking… …   English World dictionary

  • Bee W — (Сан Пауло,Бразилия) Категория отеля: Адрес: Rua Haddock Lobo, 167, Консоласау, Сан Пауло, CE …   Каталог отелей

  • BEE — (Heb. דְּבוֹרָה). Beekeeping was practiced early in the Mediterranean region. However, there is no reference to it in the Bible where the bee is mentioned only four times and only once in connection with honey (Judg. 14:9). References to bees… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism


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