basalt


basalt
basaltic, basaltine /beuh sawl"tin, -tuyn/, adj.
/beuh sawlt", bas"awlt, bay"sawlt/, n.
the dark, dense igneous rock of a lava flow or minor intrusion, composed essentially of labradorite and pyroxene and often displaying a columnar structure.
[1595-1605; < L basaltes, a misreading, in mss. of Pliny, of basanites < Gk basanítes (líthos) touchstone, equiv. to básan(os) touchstone (ult. < Egyptian bhn(w) graywacke) + -ites -ITE1]

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Dark igneous rock that is low in silica content and comparatively rich in iron and magnesium.

Some basalts are glassy (have no visible crystals), and many are very fine-grained and compact. Basaltic lavas may be spongy or pumice-like. Olivine and augite are the most common minerals in basalts; plagioclase is also present. Basalts may be broadly classified into two main groups. Calc-alkali basalts predominate among the lavas of mountain belts; the active volcanoes of Mauna Loa and Kilauea in Hawaii erupt calc-alkali lavas. Alkali basalts predominate among the lavas of the ocean basins and are also common in mountain belts.

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rock
      extrusive igneous (volcanic) rock that is low in silica content, dark in colour, and comparatively rich in iron and magnesium.

      Some basalts are quite glassy (tachylytes), and many are very fine-grained and compact; it is more usual, however, for them to exhibit porphyritic structure, with larger crystals (phenocrysts) of olivine, augite, or feldspar in a finely crystalline matrix (groundmass). Olivine and augite are the most common porphyritic minerals in basalts; porphyritic plagioclase feldspars are also found. Basaltic lavas (lava) are frequently spongy or pumiceous; the steam cavities become filled with secondary minerals such as calcite, chlorite, and zeolites.

      Basalts may be broadly classified on a chemical and petrographic basis into two main groups: the calc-alkali and the alkali basalts. Calc-alkali basaltic lavas are characterized by calcic plagioclase with augite, pigeonite or hypersthene, and olivine as the dominant mafic minerals; basalts without olivine are also well-represented. Calc-alkali basalts, which contain from 45 percent to 52 percent silica, include the tholeiites (basalts with calcium-poor pyroxene). They predominate among the lavas of mountain belts; their flows may build enormous plateaus, as in the northwestern United States, the Deccan of India, and the Paraná Basin of South America. The active volcanoes of Mauna Loa and Kilauea in Hawaii erupt tholeiitic lavas.

      Normal alkali basalt contains olivine and, commonly, a diopsidic or titaniferous augite. Alkali basalts predominate among the lavas of the ocean basins and are common among the mafic lavas of the forelands and backlands of the mountain belts. In the Brito-Icelandic province the Tertiary lava flows of the Inner Hebrides, Antrim, and the Faroe Islands include great successions of both calc-alkali and alkali basalts.

      Minerals of the feldspathoid group occur in a large number of basaltic rocks belonging to the alkali group; nepheline, analcime, and leucite are the commonest, but haüynite is occasionally present. If nepheline entirely replaces feldspar, the rock is known as nepheline-basalt; if the replacement is only partial the term nepheline-basanite is used. Similarly, there are analcime- and leucite-basalts and leucite-basanites. Most nepheline-basalts are fine-grained, very dark-coloured rocks and are of Tertiary age. They are fairly common in some parts of Germany and also occur in the United States (as in New Mexico) and in Libya, Turkey, and elsewhere. Leucite-basalts are found principally in Italy, Germany, eastern Africa, Australia, and, in the United States, in Montana, Wyoming, and Arizona.

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Universalium. 2010.

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