ax


ax
axlike, adj.
/aks/, n., pl. axes /ak"siz/, v., axed, axing.
n.
1. an instrument with a bladed head on a handle or helve, used for hewing, cleaving, chopping, etc.
2. Jazz Slang. any musical instrument.
3. have an ax to grind, to have a personal or selfish motive: His interest may be sincere, but I suspect he has an ax to grind.
4. the ax, Informal.
a. dismissal from employment: to get the ax.
b. expulsion from school.
c. rejection by a lover, friend, etc.: His girlfriend gave him the ax.
d. any usually summary removal or curtailment.
v.t.
5. to shape or trim with an ax.
6. to chop, split, destroy, break open, etc., with an ax: The firemen had to ax the door to reach the fire.
7. Informal. to dismiss, restrict, or destroy brutally, as if with an ax: The main office axed those in the field who didn't meet their quota. Congress axed the budget. Also, axe.
[bef. 1000; ME; ax(e), ex(e), OE aex, aeces; akin to Goth aquizi, ON øx, ox, OHG acc(h)us, a(c)kus (G Axt), MHG pl. exa < Gmc *akwiz-, akuz-, aksi- *ákas, áks-; L ascia ( < *acsia), Gk axíne; < IE *ag-s-]

* * *

Hand tool used for chopping, splitting, chipping, and piercing.

Stone Age hand axes originated in simple stone implements that acquired wooden hafts, or handles, about 30,000 BC. Copper-bladed axes appeared in Egypt about 4000 BC and were followed by axes with blades of bronze and eventually iron. The development of the iron-bladed felling ax in the Middle Ages made possible the vast forest clearances of Europe, North and South America, and elsewhere. Though the ax has lost much of its historic role to powered saws and other machinery, it remains a widely used tool with many uses.

* * *

tool
also spelled  Axe,  

      hand tool used for chopping, splitting, chipping, and piercing. Stone Age hand axes originated in simple stone implements that acquired wooden hafts, or handles, about 30,000 BC. Copper-bladed axes appeared in Egypt about 4000 BC and were followed by axes with blades of bronze and eventually iron; blades were fastened to hafts by a variety of means—e.g., lashed into a wooden sleeve, bound into a split of wood, inserted in a bone socket. The development of the iron-bladed felling ax in the Middle Ages made possible the vast forest clearance of northwestern Europe and the development of medieval agriculture. The ax played a similar role in land clearance in eastern Europe, Scandinavia, North and South America, and elsewhere. In modern times the ax, now with a blade or bit of steel, sometimes double-bitted or sharpened on both ends, has lost much of its historic role to powered saws and other machinery, although it remains a widely used tool with a wide variety of uses.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.