artery


artery
/ahr"teuh ree/, n., pl. arteries.
1. Anat. a blood vessel that conveys blood from the heart to any part of the body.
2. a main channel or highway, esp. of a connected system with many branches.
[1350-1400; ME < L arteria < Gk: windpipe, artery. See AORTA]

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Vessel that carries blood from the heart to other parts of the body (see cardiovascular system).

Arterial blood carries oxygen and nourishment to tissues; the one exception is the pulmonary artery, which conveys oxygen-depleted blood from the heart to the lungs for oxygenation and removal of excess carbon dioxide. Arteries are muscular, elastic tubes that transport blood under the pressure of the heart's pumping action, which can be felt as the pulse. Large arteries branch off from the aorta and give rise to smaller arteries, down to the threadlike arterioles, which branch into capillaries. An artery wall's inner layer (tunica intima) consists of an endothelial (cellular) lining, a fine connective tissue network, and a layer of elastic fibres. The middle layer (tunica media) is mostly smooth muscle cells. The outer layer (tunica externa) contains supportive collagen fibres. See also capillary; vein.

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 in human physiology, any of the vessels that, with one exception, carry oxygenated blood and nourishment from the heart to the tissues of the body. The exception, the pulmonary artery, carries oxygen-depleted blood to the lungs for oxygenation and removal of excess carbon dioxide (see pulmonary circulation).

      Arteries are muscular and elastic tubes that must transport blood under a high pressure exerted by the pumping action of the heart. The pulse, which can be felt over an artery lying near the surface of the skin, results from the alternate expansion and contraction of the arterial wall as the beating heart forces blood into the arterial system via the aorta. Large arteries branch off from the aorta and in turn give rise to smaller arteries until the level of the smallest arteries, or arterioles, is reached. The threadlike arterioles carry blood to networks of microscopic vessels called capillaries (capillary), which supply nourishment and oxygen to the tissues and carry away carbon dioxide and other products of metabolism by way of the veins.

      The largest artery is the aorta, which arises from the left ventricle of the heart. The aorta arches briefly upward before continuing downward close to the backbone; the arteries that supply blood to the head, neck, and arms arise from this arch and travel upward. As it descends along the backbone, the aorta gives rise to other major arteries that supply the internal organs of the thorax. After descending to the abdomen, the aorta divides into two terminal branches, each of which supplies blood to one leg.

      Each artery, no matter what its size, has walls with three layers, or coats. The innermost layer, or tunica intima, consists of a lining, a fine network of connective tissue, and a layer of elastic fibres bound together in a membrane pierced with many openings. The tunica media, or middle coat, is made up principally of smooth (involuntary) muscle cells and elastic fibres arranged in roughly spiral layers. The outermost coat, or tunica adventitia, is a tough layer consisting mainly of collagen fibres that act as a supportive element. The large arteries differ structurally from the medium-sized arteries in that they have a much thicker tunica media and a somewhat thicker tunica adventitia. See also cardiovascular system (human cardiovascular system).

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

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