aristocracy


aristocracy
/ar'euh stok"reuh see/, n., pl. aristocracies.
1. a class of persons holding exceptional rank and privileges, esp. the hereditary nobility.
2. a government or state ruled by an aristocracy, elite, or privileged upper class.
3. government by those considered to be the best or most able people in the state.
4. a governing body composed of those considered to be the best or most able people in the state.
5. any class or group considered to be superior, as through education, ability, wealth, or social prestige.
[1555-65; ( < MF aristocratie) < ML aristocracia (var. of -tia) < Gk aristokratía rule of the best. See ARISTO-, -CRACY]

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Originally, leadership by a small privileged class or a minority thought to be best qualified to lead.

Plato and Aristotle considered aristocrats to be those who are morally and intellectually superior, and therefore fit to govern in the interests of the people. The term has come to mean the upper layer of a stratified group. Most aristocracies have been hereditary, and many European societies stratified their aristocratic classes by formally titling their members, thereby making the term roughly synonymous with nobility. See also oligarchy.

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      government by a relatively small privileged class or by a minority consisting of those felt to be best qualified to rule.

 As conceived by the Greek philosophers Plato (c. 428/427–348/347 BC) and Aristotle (384–322 BC), aristocracy means the rule of the few best—the morally and intellectually superior—governing in the interest of the entire population. Such a form of government differs from the rule of one (by a monarchy or by a tyrant), of the ambitious, self-interested, or greedy few ( oligarchy or timocracy), or of the many ( democracy or mobocracy). Because “the best” is an evaluative and subjective notion, it is difficult to distinguish aristocratic from oligarchic or timocratic governments objectively. Because a monarchical system (monarchy) has its own aristocracy and because the people try to elect the best as their rulers in democracies (democracy), an aristocratic element also is present in these regimes. For these reasons, the term aristocracy often is used to mean the ruling upper layer of a stratified group. Thus, the upper ranks of the government form the political aristocracy of the state; the stratum of the highest religious dignitaries constitutes the aristocracy of the church; and the richest captains of industry and finance constitute an aristocracy of economic wealth.

      The Brahman caste in India, the Spartiates in Sparta, the eupatridae (eupatrid) in Athens, the patricians (patrician) or Optimates (Optimates and Populares) in Rome, and the medieval nobility in Europe are various historical examples of the social aristocracy or nobility. Most such social aristocracies both legally and factually have been hereditary aristocracies. Other aristocracies have been nonhereditary and recruited from different strata of the population, such as the upper stratum of the Roman Catholic church, the ruling aristocracy of elective republics and monarchies, the leaders of scientific and artistic organizations, and certain aristocracies of wealth.

      The distinction between aristocracy of birth and nonhereditary aristocracy is relative, because even in caste societies some low-born persons climb into the higher castes and some high-born persons slide into the lower castes. On the other hand, even in open aristocracies there is a tendency for the upper stratum to become a hereditary group filled mainly by the offspring of aristocratic parents. For example, among millionaires and billionaires living in the United States at the beginning of the 21st century, the percentage born of wealthy parents is notably higher than among American millionaires of the mid-19th century.

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Universalium. 2010.

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