Argus


Argus
/ahr"geuhs/, n.
1. Class. Myth. a giant with 100 eyes, set to guard the heifer Io: his eyes were transferred after his death to the peacock's tail.
2. a son of Phrixus and builder of the Argo.
3. (in the Odyssey) Odysseus' faithful dog, who recognized his master after twenty years and immediately died.
4. any observant or vigilant person; a watchful guardian.
5. (l.c.) Also, argus pheasant. any of several brilliantly marked Malayan pheasants of the Argusianus or Rheinardia genera.
[ < L < Gk Árgos, deriv. of argós bright, shining]

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byname  Panoptes (Greek: “All-Seeing”) 

      figure in Greek legend described variously as the son of Inachus, Agenor, or Arestor or as an aboriginal hero (autochthon). His byname derives from the hundred eyes in his head or all over his body, as he is often depicted on Athenian red-figure pottery from the late 6th century BC. Argus was appointed by the goddess Hera to watch the cow into which Io (Hera's priestess) had been transformed, but he was slain by Hermes, who is called Argeiphontes, “Slayer of Argus,” in the Homeric poems. Argus's eyes were transferred by Hera to the tail of the peacock. His fate is mentioned in a number of Greek tragedies from the 5th century BC—including two by Aeschylus, Suppliants and Prometheus Bound, and Euripides' Phoenician Women—and the Latin poet Ovid's Metamorphoses from the 1st century AD.

ship
      the first true aircraft carrier. Construction of the Argus began in 1914, and initially it was an Italian liner; it was purchased in 1916 by the British Royal Navy and converted, work being completed in September 1918. The Argus had an unobstructed flight deck about 560 feet (170.7 metres) long and a hangar that could accommodate 20 aircraft. It was armed with six four-inch guns and could reach a speed of 20.2 knots. In addition to serving as an operational carrier, the Argus was used for trials and training.

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Universalium. 2010.