apple


apple
/ap"euhl/, n.
1. the usually round, red or yellow, edible fruit of a small tree, Malus sylvestris, of the rose family.
2. the tree, cultivated in most temperate regions.
3. the fruit of any of certain other species of tree of the same genus.
4. any of these trees.
5. any of various other similar fruits, or fruitlike products or plants, as the custard apple, love apple, May apple, or oak apple.
6. anything resembling an apple in size and shape, as a ball, esp. a baseball.
7. Bowling. an ineffectively bowled ball.
8. Slang. a red capsule containing a barbiturate, esp. secobarbital.
[bef. 900; ME appel, OE aeppel; c. OFris, D appel, OS apl, appul, OHG apful (G Apfel), Crimean Goth apel < Gmc *aplu (akin to ON epli < *apljan); OIr ubull (neut.), Welsh afal, Breton aval < pre-Celtic *oblu; Lith óbuolas, -ys, Latvian âbuol(i)s (with reshaped suffix),
OPruss woble, perh. Thracian (din)upla, (sin)upyla wild pumpkin, OCS (j)abluko (repr. *ablu-ko, neut.) < Balto-Slavic *ablu-. Cf. AVALON]

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I
Fruit of the genus Malus, in the rose family, the most widely cultivated tree fruit.

Malus species are native to the temperate zones of both hemispheres. They require a considerable period of dormancy, well-drained soil, careful pruning in early years of growth, and a rigorous pest-management program for mature trees. The apple is one of the pome (fleshy) fruits. Apples at harvest vary widely in size, shape, colour, and acidity, but most are fairly round and some shade of red or yellow. The thousands of varieties fall into three broad classes: cider, cooking, and dessert varieties. Varieties that ripen in late summer generally do not store well, but those that ripen in late autumn may be stored for as long as a year. The largest producers of apples are the U.S., China, France, Italy, and Turkey. Eaten fresh or cooked in various ways, apples provide vitamins A and C, carbohydrates, and fibre.
II
(as used in expressions)

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fruit
 fruit of the genus Malus (about 25 species) belonging to the family Rosaceae, the most widely cultivated tree fruit. The apple is one of the pome (fleshy) fruits, in which the ripened ovary and surrounding tissue both become fleshy and edible. The apple flower of most varieties requires cross-pollination for fertilization. Apples at harvest, though varying widely in size, shape, colour, and acidity, depending upon cultures (variety) and environmental character, are, nevertheless, usually roundish, 50–100 mm (2–4 inches) in diameter, and some shade of red or yellow in colour.

      Apple varieties, of which there are thousands, fall into three broad classes: (1) cider varieties; (2) cooking varieties; and (3) dessert varieties, which differ widely but tend to emphasize colour, size, aroma, smoothness, and perhaps crispness and tang. Many varieties are relatively high in sugar, only mildly acidic, and very low in tannin. The apple is eaten fresh or cooked in a variety of ways. It is frequently used as a pastry filling, the apple pie being perhaps the archetypal American dessert. Especially in Europe, fried apples characteristically accompany certain dishes of sausage or pork.

      Malus species are native to the temperate zones of both hemispheres. Apples were eaten by the earliest Europeans; improved selections had been made and varieties were recognized more than 2,000 years ago. Hundreds of varieties were recognized in Europe before the settlement of the Americas. As the wave of settlement moved across North America, it was accompanied by the distribution of seedling apple varieties, perhaps by Indians and trappers, certainly by itinerants who became local legendary figures, the most prominent being Johnny Appleseed (John Chapman (Chapman, John)), a professional nurseryman who planted apple trees extensively in Ohio and Indiana.

      Since the apple requires a considerable period of dormancy, it thrives in areas having a distinct winter period, generally from latitude 30° to 60°, both north and south. Northward, apple growing is limited by low winter temperatures and a short growing season.

      The soils in which apple trees grow must be well-drained; fertilizers can be used if fertility is not high enough. Rolling hilltops or the sloping sides of hills are preferred because they provide “air drainage,” allowing the colder, heavier air to drain away to the valley below during frosty spring nights, when blossoms or young fruit would be destroyed by much exposure to cold.

      Scions of desired varieties are commonly grafted to hardy nursery seedlings of about 18 months of age; orchard planting follows one or two years later. Management during the six to eight years before appreciable apple production is reached may consist of little more than protection from competing vegetation and pests. Careful attention to pruning is required, however, especially during the first five years, so that the main scaffold branches will be well-distributed along the trunk and so that weak crotches will not develop that can break under heavy fruit loads. With mature trees, a rigorous spraying regime must be followed to protect against insect pests and possibly to delay spring development, to thin young fruit, and to hold the autumn drop of ripening fruit to a minimum.

      Apple varieties that ripen during late summer are generally of poor quality for storage. Varieties that ripen in late autumn may be stored for as long as one year, however. For long holding, temperatures only slightly above the freezing point of the fruit are generally desirable. Apples may also be stored in inert gases or in controlled atmospheres.

      The world crop of apples averages about 32,000,000 metric tons a year. Of the American crop, more than half is normally used as fresh fruit. About one-fifth is used for vinegar, juice, jelly, and apple butter. About one-sixth is canned as pie stock and applesauce. In Europe a larger fraction of the crop goes for cider, wine, and brandy. Of the total world production, one-fourth goes for cider.

      The largest producers of apples are the United States, China, France, Italy, and Turkey. The largest exporters are France, Italy, Hungary, Argentina, Chile, South Africa, and the United States.

      Apples provide vitamins A and C, are high in carbohydrates, and are an excellent source of dietary fibre.

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Universalium. 2010.

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