appeal


appeal
appealability, n.appealable, adj.appealer, n.
/euh peel"/, n.
1. an earnest request for aid, support, sympathy, mercy, etc.; entreaty; petition; plea.
2. a request or reference to some person or authority for a decision, corroboration, judgment, etc.
3. Law.
a. an application or proceeding for review by a higher tribunal.
b. (in a legislative body or assembly) a formal question as to the correctness of a ruling by a presiding officer.
c. Obs. a formal charge or accusation.
4. the power or ability to attract, interest, amuse, or stimulate the mind or emotions: The game has lost its appeal.
5. Obs. a summons or challenge.
v.i.
6. to ask for aid, support, mercy, sympathy, or the like; make an earnest entreaty: The college appealed to its alumni for funds.
7. Law. to apply for review of a case or particular issue to a higher tribunal.
8. to have need of or ask for proof, a decision, corroboration, etc.
9. to be especially attractive, pleasing, interesting, or enjoyable: The red hat appeals to me.
v.t.
10. Law.
a. to apply for review of (a case) to a higher tribunal.
b. Obs. to charge with a crime before a tribunal.
11. appeal to the country, Brit. See country (def. 11).
[1250-1300; (v.) ME a(p)pelen < AF, OF a(p)peler < L appellare to speak to, address, equiv. to ap- AP-1 + -pellare, iterative s. of pellere to push, beat against; (n.) ME ap(p)el < AF, OF apel, n. deriv. of ap(p)eler]
Syn. 1. prayer, supplication, invocation. 2. suit, solicitation. 4. attraction. 6. request, ask. APPEAL, ENTREAT, PETITION, SUPPLICATE mean to ask for something wished for or needed. APPEAL and PETITION may concern groups and formal or public requests. ENTREAT and SUPPLICATE are usually more personal and urgent. To APPEAL is to ask earnestly for help or support, on grounds of reason, justice, common humanity, etc.: to appeal for contributions to a cause.
To PETITION is to ask by written request, by prayer, or the like, that something be granted: to petition for more playgrounds. ENTREAT suggests pleading: The captured knight entreated the king not to punish him. To SUPPLICATE is to beg humbly, usually from a superior, powerful, or stern (official) person: to supplicate that the lives of prisoners be spared.

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Resort to a higher court to review the decision of a lower court, or to any court to review the order of an administrative agency.

Its scope is usually limited. In the U.S., the higher court reviews only matters in the record of the original trial; no new evidence can be presented. The Supreme Court of the United States hears appellate cases that it regards as having important implications; otherwise, appeals generally stop with the United States Courts of Appeals. See also certiorari.

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law
      the resort to a higher court to review the decision of a lower court, or to a court to review the order of an administrative agency. In varying forms, all legal systems provide for some type of appeal.

      The concept of appeal requires the existence of a judicial hierarchy. A typical hierarchy includes, at the lowest level, trial courts of limited or special jurisdiction, often called magistrates' courts (magistrates' court), justices of the peace (justice of the peace), small-claims courts, municipal courts, or police courts; trial courts of general jurisdiction that often are called district, circuit, or superior court; and a court of appellate jurisdiction, which may be the ultimate supreme court of a system. Some countries introduce an intermediate appellate court, called the court of appeals, between the trial court level and the court of ultimate appeal. Usually, each court in the hierarchy is subject to review only by the court immediately above it. Frequently, however, an intermediate step may be omitted because the importance or immediacy of a legal problem calls for direct review of the trial court by the highest appellate tribunal.

      In some countries different courts serve as the highest appeals court according to the types of cases and judicial problems. In France the Cour de Cassation (the supreme court) hears appeals on the interpretation of the law, whereas the court of appeal retries cases on the issue of fact. In contrast, the Conseil d'État hears appeals both on facts and on the interpretation of law from a separate system of administrative courts. Constitutional questions are handled by a constitutional council that is both legislative and judicial.

      In Germany the Bundesgerichtshof (Federal Court of Justice) is concerned primarily with a unified interpretation of the law, and there is a separate Bundesverfassungsgericht ( Federal Constitutional Court) to deal with constitutional questions. The court of appeals (Oberlandesgericht) retries cases both on issues of law and fact in civil matters and on issues of law only in criminal matters. The Supreme Court of the United States hears appeals on fact, interpretation, constitutional cases from lower federal courts, and appeals from state courts concerning issues of federal law. In England appeals on matters of fact in some instances go to different courts than do those on matters of law. The House of Lords (Lords, House of) is the final court of appeal. The Supreme Court of Japan serves as a final appeals court on questions of fact, law, and constitutional compatibility.

      As a practical and legal matter, only the party aggrieved by an order or judgment is entitled to seek a review in the appellate court. Neither an outsider nor the party who prevailed in the case is permitted to seek a review of the decision by a higher court. However, when persons not originally parties to the action have been permitted to intervene or have been represented by others, as in class actions, they generally have the same rights of appeal as the original parties. There are few jurisdictions in which an appeal on a verdict of acquittal in a criminal case is allowed.

      Orders and judgments of trial courts may be divided into two categories for the purposes of appeal: final and interlocutory. A final judgment is one that brings an end to litigation and leaves nothing but the execution of the judgment. In the course of a trial, however, a court is required to enter decisions that settle only subsidiary questions or some but not all of the ultimate issues. These decisions are regarded as interlocutory decrees (interlocutory decree). Although all jurisdictions sanction appeals from final judgments, appeals from interlocutory decrees are far less permissible.

      An appeal serves two basic functions. Its first and primary function is to ensure the litigants that justice under law has been accorded in the resolution of a specific controversy. The second function is the promulgation of rules of decision that will be binding on all lower courts within a judicial system and thus ensure uniformity of treatment and some measure of certainty and guidance to those whose actions bring them within the scope of the rule.

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • appeal — ap·peal 1 /ə pēl/ n [Old French apel, from apeler to call, accuse, appeal, from Latin appellare]: a proceeding in which a case is brought before a higher court for review of a lower court s judgment for the purpose of convincing the higher court… …   Law dictionary

  • Appeal — Ap*peal , n. [OE. appel, apel, OF. apel, F. appel, fr. appeler. See {Appeal}, v. t.] 1. (Law) (a) An application for the removal of a cause or suit from an inferior to a superior judge or court for re[ e]xamination or review. (b) The mode of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • appeal — [ə pēl′] vt. [ME apelen < OFr apeler < L appellare, to accost, apply to, appeal; iterative < appellere, to prepare < ad , to + pellere: see FELT1] 1. to make a request to a higher court for the rehearing or review of (a case) 2. Obs.… …   English World dictionary

  • Appeal — Ap*peal , v. t. 1. (Law) To apply for the removal of a cause from an inferior to a superior judge or court for the purpose of re[ e]xamination of for decision. Tomlins. [1913 Webster] I appeal unto C[ae]sar. Acts xxv. 11. [1913 Webster] 2. To… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Appeal — Ap*peal , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Appealed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Appealing}.] [OE. appelen, apelen, to appeal, accuse, OF. appeler, fr. L. appellare to approach, address, invoke, summon, call, name; akin to appellere to drive to; ad + pellere to drive …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • appeal — [n1] request for help address, adjuration, application, bid, call, claim, demand, entreaty, imploration, importunity, invocation, overture, petition, plea, prayer, proposal, proposition, question, recourse, requisition, solicitation, submission,… …   New thesaurus

  • appeal — The transitive use as a legal term is AmE (e.g. • The US government plans to appeal the cotton ruling, and it could be years before any penalties kick in Reason Magazine, 2004). The equivalent in BrE is appeal against • (Mr Marshall s legal… …   Modern English usage

  • Appeal — request by the provider of the object of conformity assessment to the conformity assessment body or accreditation body for reconsideration by that body of a decision it has made relating to that object (p. 6.4 ISO/IEC 17000:2004). Источник …   Словарь-справочник терминов нормативно-технической документации

  • appeal — A request to the U.S. District Court (or the bankruptcy appellate panel if there is one in the circuit) to review a decision of the bankruptcy court. A request to the Circuit Court of Appeals to review a decision of the U.S. District Court (or… …   Glossary of Bankruptcy

  • appeal — /ə pi:l/, it. /a p:il/ s. ingl. (propr. appello, attrazione ), usato in ital. al masch. [capacità di attirare] ▶◀ attrazione, fascino, richiamo, [in senso erotico] sex appeal …   Enciclopedia Italiana

  • appeal — /apˈpil, ingl. əˈpiːl/ [lett. «richiamo»] s. m. inv. fascino, richiamo, attrazione □ sex appeal …   Sinonimi e Contrari. Terza edizione


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