apology


apology
/euh pol"euh jee/, n., pl. apologies.
1. a written or spoken expression of one's regret, remorse, or sorrow for having insulted, failed, injured, or wronged another: He demanded an apology from me for calling him a crook.
2. a defense, excuse, or justification in speech or writing, as for a cause or doctrine.
3. (cap., italics) a dialogue by Plato, centering on Socrates' defense before the tribunal that condemned him to death.
4. an inferior specimen or substitute; makeshift: The tramp wore a sad apology for a hat.
[1400-50; earlier apologie, late ME apologe ( < MF) < LL apologia < Gk; see APOLOGIA]
Syn. 2. vindication. See excuse.

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In literature, an autobiographical form in which a defense is the framework for discussion of the author's personal beliefs.

Examples include Plato's Apology (4th century BC), in which Socrates answers his accusers by giving a history of his life and moral commitment, and John Henry Newman's Apologia pro Vita Sua (1864), an examination of the principles that inspired his conversion to Roman Catholicism.

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      autobiographical form in which a defense is the framework for a discussion by the author of his personal beliefs and viewpoints. An early example dating from the 4th century BC is Plato's (Plato) Apology, a philosophical dialogue dealing with the trial of Socrates, in which Socrates answers the charges of his accusers by giving a brief history of his life and his moral commitment. Such an apology is usually a self-justification. Among the famous apologies of Western literature are Apologie de Raimond Sebond (1580), an essay by Montaigne (Montaigne, Michel de), who uses a defense of the beliefs of a 15th-century Spaniard as a pretext for presenting his own skeptical views on the futility of reason; An Apology for the Life of Mr. Colley Cibber, Comedian (1740), in which the 18th-century English actor-manager answers his critic Alexander Pope with a summary of the achievements of his long career that is also one of the best theatrical histories of the period; and Apologia pro Vita Sua (1864; later retitled History of My Religious Opinions), in which John Henry Newman (Newman, John Henry) examines the religious principles that inspired his conversion to the Roman Catholic church.

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Universalium. 2010.

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  • Apology — A*pol o*gy, n.; pl. {Apologies}. [L. apologia, Gr. ?; ? from + ?: cf. F. apologie. See {Apologetic}.] 1. Something said or written in defense or justification of what appears to others wrong, or of what may be liable to disapprobation;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • apology — UK US /əˈpɒlədʒi/ noun (plural apologies) ► [C or U] the act of saying sorry or a message that says sorry: »An apology and a refund are being sent to the customer. issue/make an apology »The hotel has issued an apology for its mistake. »a letter… …   Financial and business terms

  • apology — apology, apologia, excuse, plea, pretext, alibi denote the reason or reasons offered in explanation or defense of something (as an act, a policy, or a view). In general use apology implies that one has been, at least apparently, in the wrong; it… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Apology — A*pol o*gy, v. i. To offer an apology. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] For which he can not well apology. J. Webster. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • apology — ► NOUN (pl. apologies) 1) a regretful acknowledgement of an offence or failure. 2) (an apology for) a very poor example of. 3) a justification or defence. ORIGIN Greek apologia a speech in one s own defence …   English terms dictionary

  • apology — [ə päl′ə jē] n. pl. apologies [LL(Ec) apologia < Gr, a speaking in defense < apologeisthai, to speak in defense < apo , from + logos, speech: see LOGIC] 1. a formal spoken or written defense of some idea, religion, philosophy, etc. 2. an …   English World dictionary

  • apology — index expiation Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • apology — (n.) early 15c., defense, justification, from L.L. apologia, from Gk. apologia a speech in defense, from apologeisthai to speak in one s defense, from apologos an account, story, from apo from, off (see APO (Cf. apo )) + logos speech (see …   Etymology dictionary

  • apology — [n] offering of remorse, regret acknowledgment, admission, amends, atonement, concession, confession, defense, excuse, explanation, extenuation, justification, mea culpa, mitigation, plea, redress, reparation, vindication; concepts 48,67 Ant.… …   New thesaurus

  • apology — a|pol|o|gy S3 [əˈpɔlədʒi US əˈpa: ] n plural apologies [Date: 1500 1600; : Late Latin; Origin: apologia written or spoken defense , from Greek, from apo ( APOCALYPSE) + logos speech ] 1.) [U and C] something that you say or write to show that you …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • apology — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ abject (esp. BrE), humble, profuse ▪ It was a mistake. My profuse apologies. ▪ heartfelt, profound, sincere ▪ …   Collocations dictionary


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