antenna


antenna
antennal, adj.
/an ten"euh/, n., pl. antennas for 1, antennae /-ten"ee/ for 2.
1. a conductor by which electromagnetic waves are sent out or received, consisting commonly of a wire or set of wires; aerial.
2. Zool. one of the jointed, movable, sensory appendages occurring in pairs on the heads of insects and most other arthropods. See diag. under insect.
[1640-50; < L: a sailyard]

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I
In zoology, one of a pair of slender, segmented sensory organs on the head of insects, myriapods (e.g, centipedes, millipedes), and crustaceans.

Antennae of insects, which are movable, are believed to serve as both tactual and smell receptors; in some species, the development of elaborate antennal plumes and brushlike terminations has led to the suggestion that they also serve for hearing. Evidence supports this idea only for the mosquito, whose antennae are attached to specialized structures stimulated by vibrations of the antennal shaft. In social insects (e.g., ants), antennae movements may serve as communication.
II

Component of radio, television, and radar systems that directs incoming and outgoing radio waves.

Usually of metal, antennas range in shape and size from the mastlike devices used for radio and television broadcasting to the large parabolic reflectors used to focus satellite signals and the radio waves generated by distant astronomical objects and reflect them toward the centrally located receiver. Antennas were invented in the 1880s by Heinrich Hertz; Guglielmo Marconi made many improvements.

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also called  Aerial,  

      component of radio, television, and radar systems that directs incoming and outgoing radio waves. Antennas are usually metal and have a wide variety of configurations, from the mastlike devices employed for radio and television broadcasting to the large parabolic reflectors used to receive satellite signals and the radio waves generated by distant astronomical objects.

      The first antenna was devised by the German physicist Heinrich Hertz (Hertz, Heinrich). During the late 1880s he carried out a landmark experiment to test the theory of the British mathematician-physicist James Clerk Maxwell (Maxwell, James Clerk) that visible light is only one example of a larger class of electromagnetic (electromagnetic radiation) effects that could pass through air (or empty space) as a succession of waves. Hertz built a transmitter for such waves consisting of two flat, square metallic plates, each attached to a rod, with the rods in turn connected to metal spheres spaced close together. An induction coil connected to the spheres caused a spark to jump across the gap, producing oscillating currents in the rods. The reception of waves at a distant point was indicated by a spark jumping across a gap in a loop of wire.

      The Italian physicist Guglielmo Marconi, the principal inventor of wireless telegraphy, constructed various antennas for both sending and receiving, and he also discovered the importance of tall antenna structures in transmitting low-frequency signals. In the early antennas built by Marconi and others, operating frequencies were generally determined by antenna size and shape. In later antennas frequency was regulated by an oscillator, which generated the transmitted signal.

      More powerful antennas were constructed during the 1920s by combining a number of elements in a systematic array. Metal horn antennas were devised during the subsequent decade following the development of waveguides that could direct the propagation of very high-frequency radio signals.

 Over the years, many types of antennas have been developed for different purposes. An antenna may be designed specifically to transmit or to receive, although these functions may be performed by the same antenna. A transmitting antenna, in general, must be able to handle much more electrical energy than a receiving antenna. An antenna also may be designed to transmit at specific frequencies. In the United States, amplitude modulation (AM) radio broadcasting, for instance, is done at frequencies between 535 and 1,605 kilohertz (kHz); at these frequencies, a wavelength is hundreds of metres or yards long, and the size of the antenna is therefore not critical. frequency modulation (FM) broadcasting, on the other hand, is carried out at a range from 88 to 108 megahertz (MHz). At these frequencies a typical wavelength is about 3 metres (10 feet) long, and the antenna must be adjusted more precisely to the electromagnetic wave, both in transmitting and in receiving. Antennas may consist of single lengths of wire or rods in various shapes (dipole, loop, and helical antennas), or of more elaborate arrangements of elements (linear, planar, or electronically steerable arrays). Reflectors and lens antennas use a parabolic dish to collect and focus the energy of radio waves, in much the same way that a parabolic mirror in a reflecting telescope collects light rays. Directional antennas are designed to be aimed directly at the signal source and are used in direction-finding.
 

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Universalium. 2010.

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