angle


angle
angle1
/ang"geuhl/, n., v., angled, angling.
n.
1. Geom.
a. the space within two lines or three or more planes diverging from a common point, or within two planes diverging from a common line.
b. the figure so formed.
c. the amount of rotation needed to bring one line or plane into coincidence with another, generally measured in radians or in degrees, minutes, and seconds, as in 12° 10prime; 30", which is read as 12 degrees, 10 minutes, and 30 seconds.
2. an angular projection; a projecting corner: the angles of a building.
3. a viewpoint; standpoint: He looked at the problem only from his own angle.
4. Journalism.
a. slant (def. 11).
b. the point of view from which copy is written, esp. when the copy is intended to interest a particular audience: The financial editor added a supplementary article from the investor's angle.
5. one aspect of an event, problem, subject, etc.: The accountant emphasized the tax angle of the leasing arrangement.
6. Motion Pictures, Photog. See angle shot.
7. Informal. a secret motive: She's been too friendly lately - what's her angle?
8. Astrol. any of the four interceptions of the equatorial circle by the two basic axes, the horizon and the meridian: commonly identified by the compass directions.
9. See angle iron (def. 2).
10. Slang. play the angles, to use every available means to reach one's goal: A second-rate talent can survive only by playing all the angles.
v.t.
11. to move or bend in an angle.
12. to set, fix, direct, or adjust at an angle: to angle a spotlight.
13. Journalism. to write or edit in such a way as to appeal to a particular audience; slant: She angled her column toward teenagers.
v.i.
14. to turn sharply in a different direction: The road angles to the right.
15. to move or go in angles or at an angle: The trout angled downstream.
[1350-1400; ME < MF < L angulus, of unclear orig.]
angle2
/ang"geuhl/, v., angled, angling, n.
v.i.
1. to fish with hook and line.
2. to attempt to get something by sly or artful means; fish: to angle for a compliment.
n.
3. Archaic. a fishhook or fishing tackle.
[bef. 900; ME v. angelen, n. angel, angul, OE angel, angul; c. Fris, D angel, OS, OHG angul ( > G Angel), ON ongull; Gk ankýlos bent, Skt ankusá- hook; akin to OE anga, OHG ango, L uncus, Gk ónkos hook; relation, if any, to L angulus ANGLE1 not clear]

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Any member of a Germanic people who, with the Jutes and Saxons, invaded England in the 5th century AD.

According to Bede, their homeland was Angulus, traditionally identified as the Angeln district in Schleswig. They abandoned this area when they invaded Britain, where they settled in the kingdoms of Mercia, Northumbria, East Anglia, and Middle Anglia. Their language was known, even then, as Englisc, and they gave their name to England.

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people
      member of a Germanic people, which, together with the Jutes, Saxons, and probably the Frisians, invaded England in the 5th century AD. The Angles gave their name to England, as well as to the word Englisc, used even by Saxon writers to denote their vernacular tongue. The Angles are first mentioned by Tacitus (1st century AD) as worshipers of the deity Nerthus. According to the Venerable Bede in the Ecclesiastical History of the English People, their continental homeland was centred in Angulus, traditionally identified as the Angeln district in Schleswig between the Schlei inlet and the Flensburger Förde, which they appear to have abandoned at the time of their invasion of Britain. They settled in large numbers during the 5th and 6th centuries in the kingdoms of Mercia, Northumbria, and East and Middle Anglia.

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:
(of two lines), , , / , , , , , , (where two lines meet) / , , (with a rod),


Look at other dictionaries:

  • angle — [ ɑ̃gl ] n. m. • XIIe; lat. angulus 1 ♦ Cour. Saillant ou rentrant formé par deux lignes ou deux surfaces qui se coupent. ⇒ arête, coin, encoignure, renfoncement. À l angle de la rue. Former un angle, être en angle. La maison qui fait l angle,… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Angle — An gle ([a^][ng] g l), n. [F. angle, L. angulus angle, corner; akin to uncus hook, Gr. agky los bent, crooked, angular, a gkos a bend or hollow, AS. angel hook, fish hook, G. angel, and F. anchor.] 1. The inclosed space near the point where two… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Angle D'or — L angle d or En géométrie, l angle d or est créé en divisant la circonférence c d un cercle en 2 sections a et b(<a) de telle manière que : et …   Wikipédia en Français

  • angle — ANGLE. s. m. Inclination de deux lignes qui aboutissent a un mesme point. Angle droit. angle aigu. angle obtus. angle de tant de degrez. cette muraille fait un grand angle. angle saillant. angle rentrant. l angle du centre. l angle de la… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • angle — ANGLE. s. m. Ouverture de deux lignes qui se rencontrent. Angle droit. Angle aigu. Angle obtus. Angle de quarante cinq degrés. Angle de cent degrés. Angle saillant. Angle rentrant. Une figure à plusieurs angles. [b]f♛/b] On dit aussi, Les angles… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie Française 1798

  • angle — m. angle. Angle maigre : angle aigu. Géom. > Angle agut, obtùs, drech : angle aigu, obtus, droit. voir motut …   Diccionari Personau e Evolutiu

  • angle — angle1 [aŋ′gəl] n. [ME & OFr < L angulus, a corner, angle < Gr ankylos, bent, crooked: see ANKLE] 1. a) the shape made by two straight lines meeting at a common point, the vertex, or by two planes meeting along an edge: see DIHEDRAL,… …   English World dictionary

  • Angle — An gle, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Angled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Angling}.] 1. To fish with an angle (fishhook), or with hook and line. [1913 Webster] 2. To use some bait or artifice; to intrigue; to scheme; as, to angle for praise. [1913 Webster] The… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Angle — ist der Name folgender Personen: Edward H. Angle (1855–1930), US amerikanischer Orthodontist Kurt Angle (* 1968), US amerikanischer Wrestler Sharron Angle (* 1949), US amerikanische Politikerin Diese Seite ist eine …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Angle — member of a Teutonic tribe, Old English, from L. Angli the Angles, lit. people of Angul (O.N. Öngull), a region in what is now Holstein, said to be so called for its hook like shape (see ANGLE (Cf. angle) (n.)). People from the tribe there… …   Etymology dictionary

  • angle — noun. This word had been used since the 1870s in the meaning ‘the aspect from which a matter is considered’ • (The old stagers…the men who knew all the angles, who had great experience Nevil Shute, 1944) often with a defining word: the OED gives… …   Modern English usage


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